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How trade and foreign investment affect the growth of a small but not so open economy: Australia?

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  • Krishna Iyer
  • Alicia Rambaldi
  • Kam Ki Tang

Abstract

This article analyses the impact of trade and foreign investment on a small but not so open economy, Australia, whose growth rate outpaced the majority of the OECD countries in the last decade. We model five channels of outward orientation: exports, imports, foreign direct investment, foreign portfolio investment and other foreign investment. A cointegrated vector autoregressive model, complemented by a robust Granger noncausality test, is specified to identify permanent channels of outward orientation. Imports and direct investment are found to have a growth effect in the long run. The effect of imports is almost three times that of direct investment.

Suggested Citation

  • Krishna Iyer & Alicia Rambaldi & Kam Ki Tang, 2009. "How trade and foreign investment affect the growth of a small but not so open economy: Australia?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(12), pages 1525-1532.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:12:p:1525-1532
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840601032177
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Yamada, Hiroshi & Toda, Hiro Y., 1998. "Inference in possibly integrated vector autoregressive models: some finite sample evidence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 55-95, June.
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    5. Falvey, Rod & Foster, Neil & Greenaway, David, 2004. "Imports, exports, knowledge spillovers and growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 209-213, November.
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    7. Errunza, Vihang, 2001. "Foreign Portfolio Equity Investments, Financial Liberalization, and Economic Development," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(4), pages 703-726, November.
    8. Imad Moosa, 1999. "Is the export-led growth hypothesis valid for Australia?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(7), pages 903-906.
    9. Atul Dar & Sal Amirkhalkhali, 2003. "On the impact of trade openness on growth: further evidence from OECD countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(16), pages 1761-1766.
    10. Jordan Shan & Fiona Sun, 1998. "Export-led growth hypothesis for Australia: an empirical re-investigation," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(7), pages 423-428.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mah Jai S., 2011. "Export Promotion Policies, Export Composition and Economic Development of Korea," The Law and Development Review, De Gruyter, vol. 4(2), pages 3-27, February.
    2. Kishor Sharma & Pemasiri J. Gunawardana, 2012. "The role of price and nonprice factors in predicting Australia's trade performance," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(21), pages 2679-2686, July.
    3. Turnbull, Christopher & Sun, Sizhong & Anwar, Sajid, 2016. "Trade liberalisation, inward FDI and productivity within Australia’s manufacturing sector," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 41-51.

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