IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ebl/ecbull/eb-03o00002.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Segerstrom Model: Stability, Speed of Convergence and Policy Implications

Author

Listed:
  • Thomas M. Steger

    () (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (Zurich))

Abstract

This short paper presents a simple analytical stability proof for the well-known Segerstrom (1998) model of endogenous growth. Moreover, a calibrated version of the model is employed to assess the speed of convergence. The result shows that transitional dynamics are important and, hence, the policy ineffectiveness proposition of non-scale endogenous growth models must be qualified.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas M. Steger, 2003. "The Segerstrom Model: Stability, Speed of Convergence and Policy Implications," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 15(4), pages 1-8.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-03o00002
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/EB/2003/Volume15/EB-03O00002A.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Susanto Basu, 1996. "Procyclical Productivity: Increasing Returns or Cyclical Utilization?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(3), pages 719-751.
    2. Lutz G. Arnold, 2002. "On the Effectiveness of Growth-Enhancing Policies in a Model of Growth Without Scale Effects," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 3(3), pages 339-346, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Koichi Futagami & Takeo Hori, 2010. "Technological Progress And Population Growth: Do We Have Too Few Children?," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 61(1), pages 64-84.
    2. Lin, Hwan C. & Shampine, L.F., 2014. "Finite-length Patents and Functional Differential Equations in a Non-scale R&D-based Growth Model," MPRA Paper 61603, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Ohki, Kazuyoshi, 2015. "Analysis of transition dynamics caused by technological breakthroughs: Cause of productivity slowdown and drop in existing firms’ stock prices," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 12-25.
    4. Sener, Fuat, 2008. "R&D policies, endogenous growth and scale effects," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(12), pages 3895-3916, December.
    5. repec:kap:compec:v:51:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10614-016-9597-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Tatsuro Iwaisako, 2017. "Welfare Effects of Patent Protection in a Semi-Endogenous Growth Model," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 17-27, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    7. Simon Wiederhold, 2012. "The Role of Public Procurement in Innovation: Theory and Empirical Evidence," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 43, April.
    8. Gabriel Felbermayr, 2004. "Does trade cause divergence? Dynamic panel data evidence," Economics working papers 2004-07, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O0 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - General
    • N1 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-03o00002. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John P. Conley). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.