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Education, Infrastructure, and Regional Income Performance in Arkansas

  • Thomas FULLERTON
  • Enedina LICERIO
  • Phuntsho WANGMO

Although education and infrastructure investments are widely recognized as key ingredients for regional economic development, there are many areas for which empirical estimates of the potential gains associated with these steps do not exist. Arkansas is one such regional economy in the United States. Parameter estimates for the education variables are similar in magnitude to those reported for other regions. Coefficient estimates for the infrastructure variable are not all as hypothesized, but the presence of a commercial airport is confirmed as positively correlated with per capita incomes. Model simulations indicate that raising educational attainment in counties below the respective state averages can generate substantial income gains in Arkansas.

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Article provided by Euro-American Association of Economic Development in its journal Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies.

Volume (Year): 10 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:eaa:eerese:v:10:y2010:i:10_1
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  1. Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2004. "Infrastructure and regional economic development in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 203-214.
  2. Armando Arellano & Thomas Fullerton, 2005. "Educational Attainment and Regional Economic Performance in Mexico," International Advances in Economic Research, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 11(2), pages 231-242, May.
  3. Thomas M. Fullerton, Jr., 2001. "Educational attainment and border income performance," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q III, pages 2-10.
  4. Almada, Christa & Blanco-Gonzalez, Lorenzo & Eason, Patricia & Fullerton, Thomas, 2006. "Econometric Evidence Regarding Education and Border Income Performance," MPRA Paper 451, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2006.
  5. Jones, Patricia, 2001. "Are educated workers really more productive?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 57-79, February.
  6. Sergio Destefanis & Vania Sena, 2005. "Public capital and total factor productivity: New evidence from the Italian regions, 1970-98," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(5), pages 603-617.
  7. Bronzini, Raffaello & Piselli, Paolo, 2009. "Determinants of long-run regional productivity with geographical spillovers: The role of R&D, human capital and public infrastructure," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 187-199, March.
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