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Rivalry, solidarity, and longevity among siblings

Author

Listed:
  • Robyn Donrovich

    (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)

  • Paul Puschmann

    (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)

  • Koen Matthijs

    (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Robyn Donrovich & Paul Puschmann & Koen Matthijs, 2014. "Rivalry, solidarity, and longevity among siblings," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(38), pages 1167-1198, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:31:y:2014:i:38
    as

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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol31/38/31-38.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. M. Anne Hill & June O'Neill, 1994. "Family Endowments and the Achievement of Young Children with Special Reference to the Underclass," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(4), pages 1064-1100.
    2. Humphries, Jane, 1991. "'Bread and a Pennyworth of Treacle': Excess Female Mortality in England in the 1840s," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(4), pages 451-473, December.
    3. Judith Blake, 1981. "Family size and the quality of children," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 18(4), pages 421-442, November.
    4. Preston, Samuel H. & Hill, Mark E. & Drevenstedt, Greg L., 1998. "Childhood conditions that predict survival to advanced ages among African-Americans," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 47(9), pages 1231-1246, November.
    5. Hanushek, Eric A, 1992. "The Trade-Off between Child Quantity and Quality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 84-117, February.
    6. Bengtsson, Tommy & Mineau, Geraldine P., 2009. "Early-life effects on socio-economic performance and mortality in later life: A full life-course approach using contemporary and historical sources," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(9), pages 1561-1564, May.
    7. Mark Hayward & Bridget Gorman, 2004. "The long arm of childhood: The influence of early-life social conditions on men’s mortality," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(1), pages 87-107, February.
    8. Lillard, L.A. & Waite, L.J., 1996. "Marital Disruption and Mortality," Papers 96-01, RAND - Reprint Series.
    9. Klasen, Stephan, 1998. "Marriage, Bargaining, and Intrahousehold Resource Allocation: Excess Female Mortality among Adults during Early German Development, 1740–1860," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(02), pages 432-467, June.
    10. Lundberg, Olle, 1993. "The impact of childhood living conditions on illness and mortality in adulthood," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 1047-1052, April.
    11. Elo, Irma T. & Preston, Samuel H., 1996. "Educational differentials in mortality: United States, 1979-1985," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 47-57, January.
    12. George Alter & Martin Dribe & Frans Poppel, 2007. "Widowhood, family size, and post-reproductive Mortality: a comparative Analysis of three populations in Nineteenth-Century Europe," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(4), pages 785-806, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    19th century; Belgium; early life conditions; event history analysis; gender; life course analysis; longevity; mortality risk; resource dilution; sibship size;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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