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Marital Disruption and Mortality

Author

Listed:
  • Lillard, L.A.
  • Waite, L.J.

Abstract

Both men and women appear to benefit from being married. This article uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to examine the extent to which three key factors- financial well-being, living arrangements and marital history - account for this relationship.

Suggested Citation

  • Lillard, L.A. & Waite, L.J., 1996. "Marital Disruption and Mortality," Papers 96-01, RAND - Reprint Series.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:randrs:96-01
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. James P. Smith, 2004. "New Directions in Socioeconomic Research on Aging," Labor and Demography 0403016, EconWPA.
    2. Felix Elwert & Nicholas Christakis, 2008. "Wives and ex-wives: A new test for homogamy bias in the widowhood effect," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(4), pages 851-873, November.
    3. Susanne Pech, 2004. "Portfolio decisions on life annuities and financial assets with longevity and income uncertainty," Economics working papers 2004-14, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    4. Julie Zissimopoulos & Benjamin Karney & Amy Rauer, 2008. "Marital Histories and Economic Well-Being," Working Papers WR-645, RAND Corporation.
    5. Jay Teachman, 2012. "Health Limitations and Post-Secondary School Enrollment," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(1), pages 85-96, February.
    6. Lu, Yao, 2012. "Household migration, social support, and psychosocial health: The perspective from migrant-sending areas," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 135-142.
    7. Susanne Pech, 2004. "Tax Incentives for Private Life Annuities and the Social Security Reform: Effects on Consumption and on Adverse Selection," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 60(4), pages 556-556, December.
    8. Julie Zissimopoulos & Benjamin Karney & Amy Rauer, 2008. "Marital Histories and Economic Well-Being," Working Papers wp180, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    9. Robyn Donrovich & Paul Puschmann & Koen Matthijs, 2014. "Rivalry, solidarity, and longevity among siblings," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(38), pages 1167-1198, November.
    10. Ad Bergsma & Germaine Poot & Aart Liefbroer, 2008. "Happiness in the Garden of Epicurus," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 397-423, September.
    11. Susan Averett & Laura Argys & Julia Sorkin, 2013. "In sickness and in health: an examination of relationship status and health using data from the Canadian National Public Health Survey," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 599-633, December.
    12. Theodore Iwashyna & James Zhang & Diane Lauderdale & Nicholas Christakis, 1998. "A methodology for identifying married couples in medicare data: Mortality, morbidity, and health care use among the married elderly," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(4), pages 413-419, November.
    13. George Alter & Martin Dribe & Frans Poppel, 2007. "Widowhood, family size, and post-reproductive Mortality: a comparative Analysis of three populations in Nineteenth-Century Europe," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(4), pages 785-806, November.
    14. Laura Cavalli & Alessandro Bucciol & Paolo Pertile & Veronica Polin & Nicola Sartor & Alessandro Sommacal, 2012. "Modelling life-course decisions for the analysis of interpersonal and intrapersonal redistribution," Working Papers 25/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    15. Lindström, Martin, 2009. "Marital status, social capital, material conditions and self-rated health: A population-based study," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 93(2-3), pages 172-179, December.
    16. Michael D. Hurd & Daniel McFadden & Angela Merrill, 2001. "Predictors of Mortality among the Elderly," NBER Chapters,in: Themes in the Economics of Aging, pages 171-198 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Johann K. Brunner & Susanne Pech, 2001. "Die Dritte Säule der Altersvorsorge," Economics working papers 2001-09, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    18. Julie Zissimopoulos & Benjamin Karney & Amy Rauer, 2008. "Marital Histories and Economic Well-Being," Working Papers wp180, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    19. Øystein Kravdal, 2007. "A fixed-effects multilevel analysis of how community family structure affects individual mortality in Norway," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(3), pages 519-537, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    MARIAGE; MORTALITY;

    JEL classification:

    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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