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The impact of origin region and internal migration on Italian fertility

  • Giuseppe Gabrielli

    (Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II)

  • Anna Paterno

    (University of Bari)

  • Michael J. White

    (Brown University)

Registered author(s):

    We examine the impact of population distribution on fertility in a nationally representative sample. We exploit detailed life-history data to conduct an event-history analysis of transition to first birth, examining mechanisms that might link migration and fertility: socialization, adaptation, selection, and disruption. Our multivariate analysis examines various socio-demographic traits, the place of birth, and interregional migration. Differences by region and migration stream are partly explained by compositional factors, such as female employment, union type, and education. The analysis presents much evidence for demographic selection and socialization and less for adaptation or disruption. The persistence of the region of origin differentials points to the continuing importance of the context.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol17/24/17-24.pdf
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    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 17 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 24 (December)
    Pages: 705-740

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:17:y:2007:i:24
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    1. Regina T. Riphahn & Jochen Mayer, 2000. "Fertility assimilation of immigrants: Evidence from count data models," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 241-261.
    2. Francesco C. Billari & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2002. "Patterns of lowest-low fertility in Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-040, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    3. Hans-Peter Kohler & Francesco C. Billari & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "The Emergence of Lowest-Low Fertility in Europe During the 1990s," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 641-680.
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