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Birth month, school graduation, and the timing of births and marriages

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  • Vegard Skirbekk
  • Hans-Peter Kohler
  • Alexia Prskawetz

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  • Vegard Skirbekk & Hans-Peter Kohler & Alexia Prskawetz, 2004. "Birth month, school graduation, and the timing of births and marriages," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(3), pages 547-568, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:41:y:2004:i:3:p:547-568
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2004.0028
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hans‐Peter Kohler & Francesco C. Billari & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "The Emergence of Lowest‐Low Fertility in Europe During the 1990s," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 641-680, December.
    2. John Bound & David A. Jaeger, 1996. "On the Validity of Season of Birth as an Instrument in Wage Equations: A Comment on Angrist & Krueger's "Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Scho," NBER Working Papers 5835, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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