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Geographical distances between adult children and their parents in the Netherlands


  • Francesca Michielin

    (Universiteit van Amsterdam)

  • Clara H. Mulder

    (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen)


We investigate the determinants of geographical distances to parents. We focus on the role of family members who live outside the household (the parents themselves, and siblings), and on the distinction between the effects of life events and effects related to the timing with which these events have been experienced in the life course. We use data from the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study and linear regression models on the logarithm of distance. We find that life-course characteristics are much more important to the distance to parents than parental characteristics. Sibling characteristics, most notably the presence of a sister, also have an impact on this distance.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesca Michielin & Clara H. Mulder, 2007. "Geographical distances between adult children and their parents in the Netherlands," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(22), pages 655-678, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:17:y:2007:i:22

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
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    3. A M Warnes, 1986. "The Residential Mobility Histories of Parents and Children, and Relationships to Present Proximity and Social Integration," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 18(12), pages 1581-1594, December.
    4. Borjas, George J., 1998. "To Ghetto or Not to Ghetto: Ethnicity and Residential Segregation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 228-253, September.
    5. Merril Silverstein, 1995. "Stability and change in temporal distance between the elderly and their children," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 32(1), pages 29-45, February.
    6. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    7. Fuqin Bian & John Logan & Yanjie Bian, 1998. "Intergenerational relations in urban China: Proximity, contact, and help to parents," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(1), pages 115-124, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Clara Mulder & Caroline Dewilde & Mark Duijn & Annika Smits, 2015. "The Association Between Parents’ and Adult Children’s Homeownership: A Comparative Analysis," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 31(5), pages 495-527, December.
    2. Annika Smits, 2010. "Moving close to parents and adult children in the Netherlands: the influence of support needs," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(31), pages 985-1014, June.
    3. Helena Holmlund & Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2013. "Meet the Parents? Family Size and the Geographic Proximity Between Adult Children and Older Mothers in Sweden," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(3), pages 903-931, June.

    More about this item


    intergenerational proximity;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General


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