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Does Deliberation Matter in FOMC Monetary Policymaking? The Volcker Revolution of 1979

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  • Bailey, Andrew
  • Schonhardt-Bailey, Cheryl

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  • Bailey, Andrew & Schonhardt-Bailey, Cheryl, 2008. "Does Deliberation Matter in FOMC Monetary Policymaking? The Volcker Revolution of 1979," Political Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(04), pages 404-427, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:polals:v:16:y:2008:i:04:p:404-427_00
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    Cited by:

    1. T. Philipp Dybowski & Bernd Kempa, 2019. "The ECB’s monetary pillar after the financial crisis," CQE Working Papers 8519, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.
    2. Stephen Hansen & Michael McMahon & Andrea Prat, 2018. "Transparency and Deliberation Within the FOMC: A Computational Linguistics Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 133(2), pages 801-870.
    3. Goodhart, Lucy, 2015. "Brave new world? Macro prudential policy and the new political economy of The Federal Reserve," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60952, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Stephen Hansen & Michael McMahon, 2016. "Shocking Language: Understanding the Macroeconomic Effects of Central Bank Communication," NBER Chapters,in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2015 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Arnab Bhattacharjee & Sean Holly, 2015. "Influence, Interactions and Heterogeneity: Taking Personalities out of Monetary Policy Decision-making," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(2), pages 153-182, March.
    6. Martin, Nona & Storr, Virgil Henry, 2012. "Talk changes things: The implications of McCloskey's Bourgeois Dignity for historical inquiry," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 787-791.
    7. Dodge Cahan & Luisa Dörr & Niklas Potrafke, 2019. "Government ideology and monetary policy in OECD countries," ifo Working Paper Series 296, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

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