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The Period Of Financial Distress In Speculative Markets: Interacting Heterogeneous Agents And Financial Constraints

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  • Gallegati, Mauro
  • Palestrini, Antonio
  • Rosser, J. Barkley

Abstract

We investigate how stochastic asset price dynamics with herding and financial constraints explains the presence of a period of financial distress (PFD) following the peak and preceding the crash of a bubble [Charles P. Kindleberger, Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crisis , 4th ed. (New York: Wiley, 2000, Appendix B)] as common among most major historical speculative bubbles. Simulations show that the PFD is due to (1) agents' wealth distribution dynamics and (2) positive and sufficiently high transaction costs generating losses for a significant mass of the agents' distribution after the peak of the bubble. The use of transaction costs to get the result is only a modeling tool. Many other mechanisms—able to generate losses for a large mass of the agents' distribution in periods in which financial constraints bind—can produce the same result. The paper also shows how the PFD is affected by a variation of the sensitivity of price to the excess demand and by the switching strategy.

Suggested Citation

  • Gallegati, Mauro & Palestrini, Antonio & Rosser, J. Barkley, 2011. "The Period Of Financial Distress In Speculative Markets: Interacting Heterogeneous Agents And Financial Constraints," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(01), pages 60-79, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:15:y:2011:i:01:p:60-79_09
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Day, Richard H. & Huang, Weihong, 1990. "Bulls, bears and market sheep," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 299-329, December.
    2. Tirole, Jean, 1982. "On the Possibility of Speculation under Rational Expectations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(5), pages 1163-1181, September.
    3. De Long, J Bradford, et al, 1990. " Positive Feedback Investment Strategies and Destabilizing Rational Speculation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(2), pages 379-395, June.
    4. Carl Chiarella & Mauro Gallegati & Roberto Leombruni & Antonio Palestrini, 2003. "Asset Price Dynamics among Heterogeneous Interacting Agents," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 22(2), pages 213-223, October.
    5. Bischi, Gian-Italo & Gallegati, Mauro & Gardini, Laura & Leombruni, Roberto & Palestrini, Antonio, 2006. "Herd Behavior And Nonfundamental Asset Price Fluctuations In Financial Markets," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 502-528, September.
    6. Harrison Hong & Jeremy C. Stein, 2003. "Differences of Opinion, Short-Sales Constraints, and Market Crashes," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 16(2), pages 487-525.
    7. William A. Brock, 1993. "Pathways to randomness in the economy: Emergent nonlinearity and chaos in economics and finance," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 8(1), pages 3-55.
    8. Kaizoji, Taisei, 2000. "Speculative bubbles and crashes in stock markets: an interacting-agent model of speculative activity," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 287(3), pages 493-506.
    9. Chiarella, Carl & He, Xue-Zhong, 2002. "Heterogeneous Beliefs, Risk and Learning in a Simple Asset Pricing Model," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 19(1), pages 95-132, February.
    10. Carl Chiarella, 1992. "The Dynamics of Speculative Behaviour," Working Paper Series 13, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Li, Xi Hao, 2013. "Standardization for Agent-based Modeling in Economics," MPRA Paper 47396, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. repec:pid:journl:v:55:y:2016:i:2:p:79-93 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Zhi-Qiang Jiang & Wei-Xing Zhou & D. Sornette & Ryan Woodard & Ken Bastiaensen & Peter Cauwels, "undated". "Bubble Diagnosis and Prediction of the 2005-2007 and 2008-2009 Chinese stock market bubbles," Working Papers CCSS-09-008, ETH Zurich, Chair of Systems Design.
    4. Semmler, Willi & Bernard, Lucas, 2012. "Boom–bust cycles: Leveraging, complex securities, and asset prices," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 442-465.
    5. Chiarella, Carl & He, Xue-Zhong & Huang, Weihong & Zheng, Huanhuan, 2012. "Estimating behavioural heterogeneity under regime switching," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 83(3), pages 446-460.
    6. Hüsler, A. & Sornette, D. & Hommes, C.H., 2013. "Super-exponential bubbles in lab experiments: Evidence for anchoring over-optimistic expectations on price," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 304-316.
    7. Gomes, Orlando, 2012. "Attentiveness cycles: Synchronized behavior and aggregate fluctuations," Revista Brasileira de Economia - RBE, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil), vol. 66(3), October.
    8. J. Rosser & Marina Rosser & Mauro Gallegati, 2012. "A Minsky-Kindleberger Perspective on the Financial Crisis," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 449-458.
    9. Yosra Mefteh Rekik & Younes Boujelbene, 2015. "Price Dynamics and Market Volatility: Behavioral Heterogeneity under Switching Trading Strategies on Artificial Financial Market," International Journal of Financial Research, International Journal of Financial Research, Sciedu Press, vol. 6(2), pages 33-43, April.
    10. Rosser Jr., J. Barkley, 2007. "The rise and fall of catastrophe theory applications in economics: Was the baby thrown out with the bathwater?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 3255-3280, October.
    11. Huang, Weihong & Zheng, Huanhuan, 2012. "Financial crises and regime-dependent dynamics," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 445-461.

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