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Competition among the exchanges before the SEC: was the NYSE a natural hegemon?

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  • White, Eugene N.

Abstract

Improved information technology and higher volume should drive orders to be concentrated in one market, lowering the costs of transactions. However, the opposite occurred during the bull market of the 1920s when rapid technological change spawned a flood of new issues. This paper employs newly recovered data for 1900-1933 on the volume and seat prices of regional exchanges to examine how these rivals successfully competed with the NYSE, leading to its relative decline at the zenith of the market. The history of U.S. exchanges reveals that the tendency towards concentration of trading is periodically reversed when new industries, whose technologies are risky and unfamiliar, are more easily accommodated by existing or new rivals to the dominant exchange
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Suggested Citation

  • White, Eugene N., 2013. "Competition among the exchanges before the SEC: was the NYSE a natural hegemon?," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(01), pages 29-48, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:fihrev:v:20:y:2013:i:01:p:29-48_00
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Schwert, G. William, 1977. "Stock exchange seats as capital assets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 51-78, January.
    2. Marco Pagano, 1989. "Trading Volume and Asset Liquidity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 104(2), pages 255-274.
    3. Davis, Lance E. & Neal, Larry & White, Eugene, 2007. "The Highest Price Ever: The Great NYSE Seat Sale of 1928 1929 and Capacity Constraints," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 67(03), pages 705-739, September.
    4. Huddart, Steven & Hughes, John S. & Brunnermeier, Markus, 1999. "Disclosure requirements and stock exchange listing choice in an international context," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1-3), pages 237-269, January.
    5. Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "Continuous Auctions and Insider Trading," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1315-1335, November.
    6. George Garvy, 1944. "Rivals and Interlopers in the History of the New York Security Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52, pages 128-128.
    7. Anat R. Admati, Paul Pfleiderer, 1988. "A Theory of Intraday Patterns: Volume and Price Variability," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 1(1), pages 3-40.
    8. repec:bla:joares:v:31:y:1993:i::p:183-223 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Naomi R. Lamoreaux & Kenneth L. Sokoloff & Dhanoos Sutthiphisal, 2008. "The Reorganization of Inventive Activity in the United States during the Early Twentieth Century," NBER Chapters,in: Understanding Long-Run Economic Growth: Geography, Institutions, and the Knowledge Economy, pages 235-274 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Bruce G. Carruthers & Naomi R. Lamoreaux, 2016. "Regulatory Races: The Effects of Jurisdictional Competition on Regulatory Standards," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(1), pages 52-97, March.
    3. Asaf Bernstein & Eric Hughson & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2014. "Counterparty Risk and the Establishment of the New York Stock Exchange Clearinghouse," NBER Working Papers 20459, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Jérémy Ducros & Angelo Riva, 2014. "The Lyon Stock Exchange: A Struggle for Survival (1866-1914)," PSE Working Papers halshs-00960528, HAL.
    5. Jérémy Ducros & Angelo Riva, 2014. "The Lyon Stock Exchange: A Struggle for Survival (1866-1914)," Working Papers halshs-00960528, HAL.
    6. Campbell, Gareth & Rogers, Meeghan & Turner, John D., 2016. "The rise and decline of the UK's provincial stock markets, 1869-1929," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2016-03, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • N21 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913
    • N22 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-

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