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Pension Provision and Retirement Saving: Lessons from the United Kingdom

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Listed:
  • Richard Disney
  • Carl Emmerson
  • Matthew Wakefield

Abstract

We describe the trajectory of pension reform in the United Kingdom, which focuses on restraining the cost of the public program as the population ages while maintaining adequate income security for low-income households in retirement. Methods for achieving these aims have been to target public benefits to lowincome households, to permit individuals to opt out of the second tier of the public program into private retirement accounts, and to offer tax incentives to encourage additional private retirement saving. Frequent program reforms raise concerns as to whether households can make reasonable private saving provision in light of the growing complexity and potential shortcomings of individual decision-making. This paper sheds some light on these issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Matthew Wakefield, 2008. "Pension Provision and Retirement Saving: Lessons from the United Kingdom," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 34(s1), pages 155-176, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:34:y:2008:i:s1:p:155-176
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Woojin Chung & Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Matthew Wakefield, "undated". "Public policy and retirement saving incentives in the UK," Discussion Papers 06/03, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
    2. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Matthew Wakefield, 2007. "Tax reform and retirement saving incentives: evidence from the introduction of stakeholder pensions in the UK," IFS Working Papers W07/19, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. John Karl Scholz & Ananth Seshadri & Surachai Khitatrakun, 2006. "Are Americans Saving "Optimally" for Retirement?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(4), pages 607-643, August.
    4. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson, 2005. "Public pension reform in the United Kingdom: what effect on the financial well-being of current and future pensioners?," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 26(1), pages 55-81, March.
    5. Richard Disney & Edward Whitehouse, 1992. "Personal pensions and the review of the contracting-out terms," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 13(1), pages 38-53, February.
    6. Milligan, Kevin, 2003. "How do contribution limits affect contributions to tax-preferred savings accounts?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 253-281, February.
    7. Richard Disney, 2006. "Household Saving Rates and the Design of Public Pension Programmes: Cross–Country Evidence," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 198(1), pages 61-74, October.
    8. R Disney & C Emmerson & M Wakefield, 2001. "Pension reform and saving in Britain," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(1), pages 70-94, Spring.
    9. James Banks & Sarah Smith, 2006. "Retirement in the UK," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 40-56, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Gregg, 2008. "UK Welfare Reform 1996 to 2008 and beyond: A personalised and responsive welfare system?," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/196, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Matthew Wakefield, 2007. "Tax reform and retirement saving incentives: evidence from the introduction of stakeholder pensions in the UK," IFS Working Papers W07/19, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. James Banks & Carl Emmerson & Gemma Tetlow, 2005. "Estimating pension wealth of ELSA respondents," IFS Working Papers W05/09, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    4. Alexander M. Danzer & Peter Dolton & Chiara Rosazza Bondibene, 2016. "Who Wins? Evaluating the Impact of UK Public Sector Pension Scheme Reforms," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 237(1), pages 38-46, August.
    5. M. Asghar Zaidi & Klaas de Vos, 2002. "Income Mobility of the Elderly in Great Britain and The Netherlands: A Comparative Investigation," Economics Series Working Papers 107, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    6. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Sarah Smith, 2004. "Pension Reform and Economic Performance in Britain in the 1980s and 1990s," NBER Chapters,in: Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, pages 233-274 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Cagri Seda Kumru & John Piggott, 2010. "Should Public Retirement Pensions Be Means-tested?," DEGIT Conference Papers c015_049, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions

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