IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/col/000107/016936.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

What is the Fiscal Stress in Euro Area? Evidence from a Joint Monetary-Fiscal Structural Model

Author

Listed:
  • Eddie Gerba

Abstract

I examine the importance of fiscal policy in stabilizing the Euro Area economy and the degree of interaction with monetary policy. The results provide solid evidence of a common fiscal reaction in the monetary union despite the lack of a formal fiscal union. I identify area-wide shocks and find statistically significant (endogenous) responses of fiscal policies to shocks. I also find strong evidence for interactions between fiscaland monetary policy. Said that, the nature of interactions depends very much on the shocks that hit the economy. At the same time, the way the two fiscal policies interact with monetary policy is also different and independent of each other. Furthermore, the spending multiplier is higher than the tax multiplier. Nonetheless, their relative efficacy has changed over time, with the spending (tax) multiplier falling (rising) since the onset of the Great Recession. To conclude, there are considerable differences in the nature of Euro Area monetary-fiscal interactions compared to the US. Not only are the impulse responses to different shocks significantly different, but also the fiscal multipliers vary a lot. Keynesian (or spending-oriented) fiscal policy is more effective in expanding output in the Euro Area while tax reductions are more effective in the US. ****** El artículo estudia la importancia de la política fiscal en la estabilización de la economía de la Zona Euro y el grado de interacción con la política monetaria. Los resultados ofrecen evidencia sólida de una reacción fiscal común en la unión monetaria a pesar de que formalmente no existe una unión fiscal. Se identifican los choques a nivel de la zona y se encuentra que las respuestas (endógenas) de las políticas fiscales a esos choques son estadísticamente significativas. Asimismo se encuentra evidencia fuerte de la interacción entre las políticas fiscal y monetaria. No obstante, la naturaleza de esa interacción depende mucho del tipo de los choques. Además, la forma en que cada uno de los dos tipos de política fiscal interactúa con la política monetaria es diferente e independiente de la otra. Adicionalmente el multiplicador del gasto es mayor que el de los impuestos; sin embargo, su relativa eficacia ha variado en el tiempo, con el multiplicador del gasto (impuesto) cayendo (aumentando) desde el comienzo de la Gran Recesión. Finalmente, se hallan diferencias considerables en la naturaleza de las interacciones de las políticas fiscal y monetaria entre la zona euro y los Estados Unidos. Aparte de que los impulso respuestas a los diferentes choques son significativamente diferentes, los multiplicadores fiscales varían demasiado. La política fiscal keynesiana (u orientada al gasto) es más efectiva en expandir la actividad económica en la Zona Euro mientras que las reducciones de impuestos son más efectivas en los Estados Unidos.

Suggested Citation

  • Eddie Gerba, 2018. "What is the Fiscal Stress in Euro Area? Evidence from a Joint Monetary-Fiscal Structural Model," Revista ESPE - Ensayos Sobre Política Económica, Banco de la República - ESPE, vol. 36(85), pages 21-47, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000107:016936
    DOI: 10.32468/Espe.8502
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.32468/Espe.8502
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pablo Burriel & Francisco de Castro & Daniel Garrote & Esther Gordo & Joan Paredes & Javier J. Pérez, 2010. "Fiscal Policy Shocks in the Euro Area and the US: An Empirical Assessment," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 31(2), pages 251-285, June.
    2. Michal Franta & Jan Libich & Petr Stehlík, 2018. "Tracking Monetary-Fiscal Interactions across Time and Space," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 14(3), pages 167-227, June.
    3. Alloza, Mario & Burriel, Pablo & Pérez, Javier J., 2019. "Fiscal policies in the euro area: Revisiting the size of spillovers," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-1.
    4. Roberto Perotti, 2008. "In Search of the Transmission Mechanism of Fiscal Policy," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2007, Volume 22, pages 169-226, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Christopher J. Erceg & Jesper Linde, 2012. "Fiscal Consolidation in an Open Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 186-191, May.
    6. Markus Kirchner & Jacopo Cimadomo & Sebastian Hauptmeier, 2010. "Transmission of Government Spending Shocks in the Euro Area: Time Variation and Driving Forces," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-021/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    7. Fragetta, Matteo & Kirsanova, Tatiana, 2010. "Strategic monetary and fiscal policy interactions: An empirical investigation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(7), pages 855-879, October.
    8. Davig, Troy & Leeper, Eric M., 2011. "Monetary-fiscal policy interactions and fiscal stimulus," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 211-227, February.
    9. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 2002. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1329-1368.
    10. Giavazzi, Francesco & Jappelli, Tullio & Pagano, Marco, 2000. "Searching for non-linear effects of fiscal policy: Evidence from industrial and developing countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(7), pages 1259-1289, June.
    11. Canova, Fabio & Paustian, Matthias, 2011. "Business cycle measurement with some theory," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(4), pages 345-361.
    12. Fabio Canova & Evi Pappa, 2007. "Price Differentials in Monetary Unions: The Role of Fiscal Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(520), pages 713-737, April.
    13. de Walque, Gregory & Pisani, Massimiliano & Kilponen, Juha & Thomas, Carlos & Hlédik, Tibor & Hurtado, Samuel & Hollmayr, Josef & Corbo, Vesna & Schmidt, Sebastian & Micallef, Brian & Maria, José R. &, 2015. "Comparing fiscal multipliers across models and countries in Europe," Working Paper Series 1760, European Central Bank.
    14. Chadha, Jagjit S. & Corrado, Luisa & Sun, Qi, 2010. "Money and liquidity effects: Separating demand from supply," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1732-1747, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Eddie Gerba, 2018. "What is the Fiscal Stress in Euro Area? Evidence from a Joint Monetary-Fiscal Structural Model," Revista ESPE - Ensayos sobre Política Económica, Banco de la Republica de Colombia, vol. 36(85), pages 21-47, April.
    2. Gerba, Eddie, 2018. "What is the fiscal stress in Euro Area? Evidence from a joint monetary-fiscal structural model," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 88300, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Eddie Gerba & Klemens Hauzenberger, 2013. "Estimating US Fiscal and Monetary Interactions in a Time Varying VAR," Studies in Economics 1303, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    4. repec:ehl:lserod:56406 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Michal Franta & Jan Libich & Petr Stehlík, 2018. "Tracking Monetary-Fiscal Interactions across Time and Space," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 14(3), pages 167-227, June.
    6. Fotiou, Alexandra & Shen, Wenyi & Yang, Shu-Chun S., 2020. "The fiscal state-dependent effects of capital income tax cuts," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 117(C).
    7. Sebastian Gechert, 2015. "What fiscal policy is most effective? A meta-regression analysis," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 553-580.
    8. Jacopo Cimadomo & Antonello D'Agostino, 2016. "Combining Time Variation and Mixed Frequencies: an Analysis of Government Spending Multipliers in Italy," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(7), pages 1276-1290, November.
    9. Francesco Caprioli & Sandro Momigliano, 2011. "The effects of fiscal shocks with debt-stabilizing budgetary policies in Italy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 839, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    10. Giancarlo Corsetti & André Meier & Gernot J. Müller, 2012. "What determines government spending multipliers? [Mafia and public spending: Evidence of the fiscal multiplier from a quasi-experiment’, mimeo]," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 27(72), pages 521-565.
    11. Jacopo Cimadomo & Sebastian Hauptmeier & Sergio Sola, 2011. "Identifying the Effects of Government Spending Shocks with and without Expected Reversal: an Approach Based on U.S. Real-Time Data," IHEID Working Papers 12-2011, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    12. Sebastian Gechert & Ansgar Rannenberg, 2014. "Are Fiscal Multipliers Regime-Dependent? A Meta Regression Analysis," IMK Working Paper 139-2014, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    13. Baum, Anja & Koester, Gerrit B., 2011. "The impact of fiscal policy on economic activity over the business cycle - evidence from a threshold VAR analysis," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2011,03, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    14. Born, Benjamin & Juessen, Falko & Müller, Gernot J., 2013. "Exchange rate regimes and fiscal multipliers," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 446-465.
    15. AMENDOLA, Adalgiso & DI SERIO, Mario & FRAGETTA, Matteo, 2018. "The Government Spending Multiplier at the Zero Lower Bound: Evidence from the Euro Area," CELPE Discussion Papers 153, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
    16. Candelon, Bertrand & Lieb, Lenard, 2013. "Fiscal policy in good and bad times," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 2679-2694.
    17. Andrew Mountford & Harald Uhlig, 2009. "What are the effects of fiscal policy shocks?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(6), pages 960-992.
    18. Alejandro López-Vera & Andrés D. Pinchao-Rosero & Norberto Rodríguez-Niño, 2018. "Non-Linear Fiscal Multipliers for Public Expenditure and Tax Revenue in Colombia," Revista ESPE - Ensayos sobre Política Económica, Banco de la Republica de Colombia, vol. 36(85), pages 48-64, April.
    19. Attinasi, Maria Grazia & Metelli, Luca, 2017. "Is fiscal consolidation self-defeating? A panel-VAR analysis for the Euro area countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 147-164.
    20. Umut UNAL, 2015. "Rethinking The Effects Of Fiscal Policy On Macroeconomic Aggregates: A Disaggregated Svar Analysis," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(3), pages 120-135, September.
    21. Amendola, Adalgiso & Di Serio, Mario & Fragetta, Matteo & Melina, Giovanni, 2020. "The euro-area government spending multiplier at the effective lower bound," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:col:000107:016936. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Espe (email available below). General contact details of provider: .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.