IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/col/000107/012390.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis and Elderly Migration

Author

Listed:
  • Oscar Iván Ávila Montealegre

    ()

  • Mauricio Rodríguez Acosta
  • Hernando Zuleta González

Abstract

We present a model with two Overlapping Generations (young and old) and two final goods: a) a tradable good that is produced using capital and labor, and b) a non-tradable good that is produced using labor as unique input. We maintain the fundamental assumption of perfect factor mobility between sectors so the model is consistent with the Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis. On top of this, we allow for one of the two generations (the elderly) to migrate between economies. Given the general equilibrium structure of our model, we can examine the effect of the propensity to save on migration and the relative price of the non-tradable good. In this setting, we find that the elderly have incentives to migrate from economies where productivity is high to economies with low productivity because of the lower cost of living (in more general terms, the elderly migrate from wealthy countries to countries with lower incomes). We also find that, for countries with lower incomes, elderly migration has a positive effect on wages and capital accumulation. ****** Este documento presenta un modelo con dos generaciones traslapadas (jóvenes y ancianos) y con dos bienes finales: transables y no transables. Los primeros se producen utilizando trabajo y capital, mientras que los segundos utilizan trabajo como único factor de producción. De igual forma, se supone libre movilidad de factores entre los sectores, por lo que el modelo concuerda con la hipótesis de Balassa-Samuelson. Además de esto, se asume que los ancianos pueden migrar de un país a otro. Dada la estructura de equilibrio general, se examinan los efectos que los choques en la tasa de ahorro tienen en la migración y los precios relativos de los no transables. En este contexto, se encuentra que los ancianos tienen incentivos para migrar de economías donde la productividad es alta a economías donde esta es baja, dado el menor costo de vida. De forma similar, se encuentra que la migración de ancianos tiene un efecto positivo en los salarios y la acumulación de capital en las economías pobres.

Suggested Citation

  • Oscar Iván Ávila Montealegre & Mauricio Rodríguez Acosta & Hernando Zuleta González, 2014. "The Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis and Elderly Migration," ENSAYOS SOBRE POLÍTICA ECONÓMICA, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA - ESPE, vol. 32(74), pages 1-8, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000107:012390
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90339574&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=387&ty=103&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=www.elsevier.es&lan=en&fichero=387v32n74a90339574pdf001.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Swan, Trevor W, 2002. "Economic Growth," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(243), pages 375-380, December.
    2. Égert, Balázs, 2002. "Investigating the Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis in transition : Do we understand what we see?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 6/2002, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    3. Dumitru, Ionut & Jianu, Ionela, 2009. "The Balassa-Samuelson effect in Romania - The role of regulated prices," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 194(3), pages 873-887, May.
    4. Heather Gibson & Jim Malley, 2008. "The Contribution of Sectoral Productivity Differentials to Inflation in Greece," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 19(5), pages 629-650, November.
    5. Bela Balassa, 1964. "The Purchasing-Power Parity Doctrine: A Reappraisal," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 72, pages 584-584.
    6. Takatoshi Ito & Peter Isard & Steven Symansky, 1999. "Economic Growth and Real Exchange Rate: An Overview of the Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis in Asia," NBER Chapters,in: Changes in Exchange Rates in Rapidly Developing Countries: Theory, Practice, and Policy Issues (NBER-EASE volume 7), pages 109-132 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Sándor Illés, 2005. "Elderly immigration to Hungary," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 2(2), pages 164-169, October.
    8. Cebula, Richard J., 1993. "The impact of living costs on geographic mobility," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 101-105.
    9. Rumen Dobrinsky, 2003. "Convergence in Per Capita Income Levels, Productivity Dynamics and Real Exchange Rates in the EU Acceding Countries," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 305-334, September.
    10. Hughes, Gordon & McCormick, Barry, 1981. "Do Council Housing Policies Reduce Migration between Regions?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 91(364), pages 919-937, December.
    11. Falvey, Rodney E & Gemmell, Norman, 1996. "A Formalisation and Test of the Factor Productivity Explanation of International Differences in Service Prices," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(1), pages 85-102, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tradable and non-tradable; Overlapping generations; Balassa-Samuelson; Elderly migration;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:col:000107:012390. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Espe). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.