IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ces/ifosdt/v54y2001i01p15-23.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Warum unterscheiden sich die langfristigen Wachstums- und Produktivitätstrends Europas und der USA?

Author

Listed:
  • Bernhard Felderer

Abstract

In den sechziger Jahren lag das reale Wachstum in Europa noch über dem der USA. Danach sanken in beiden Teilen der Welt tendenziell die Wachstumsraten. Anfang der Achtziger Jahre folgte allerdings in den USA eine Phase hohen Wirtschaftswachstums, so dass die Wachstumsraten und die Beschäftigungszunahme wesentlich höher als jene in Europa sind. Diese unterschiedliche Entwicklung wird nach Prof. Bernhard Felderer, Direktor des Instituts für Höhere Studien in Wien und Professor für Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Universität zu Köln, u.a. durch die weitaus größere Anwendung neuer Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien in den USA verursacht. Der Abstand zwischen Europa und den USA in diesem Bereich, der sich in der zweiten Hälfte der neunziger Jahre vergrößert hat, ist kein Zufall, sondern mit rationalem ökonomischen Kalkül erklärbar: Die Kosten des Einsatzes neuer IKT in den Unternehmen und die Kosten des Betriebs eines privaten PC waren in Europa in den neunziger Jahren mehrfach so hoch als in den USA. Auch aufgrund der hohen Regulierungsdichte blieb Europa in den Achtziger und neunziger Jahren in der Produktivitätsentwicklung hinter den USA zurück. Diese unterschiedlichen Entwicklungstrends zwischen den USA und Europa werden sich nicht kurzfristig beseitigen lassen und in den nächsten Jahren fortbestehen.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernhard Felderer, 2001. "Warum unterscheiden sich die langfristigen Wachstums- und Produktivitätstrends Europas und der USA?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 54(01), pages 15-23, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ifosdt:v:54:y:2001:i:01:p:15-23
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/ifosd_2001_1_3.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. J. Bradford DeLong & Lawrence H. Summers, 1986. "The Changing Cyclical Variability of Economic Activity in the United States," NBER Chapters,in: The American Business Cycle: Continuity and Change, pages 679-734 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2002. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization, and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 339-376.
    3. Romer, Christina, 1986. "Spurious Volatility in Historical Unemployment Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(1), pages 1-37, February.
    4. Balke, Nathan S & Gordon, Robert J, 1989. "The Estimation of Prewar Gross National Product: Methodology and New Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(1), pages 38-92, February.
    5. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: U.S. Economic Growth in the Information Age," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 31(1), pages 125-236.
    6. Robert Lensink & Hong Bo & Elmer Sterken, 1999. "Does uncertainty affect economic growth? An empirical analysis," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 135(3), pages 379-396, September.
    7. Christina D. Romer, 1999. "Changes in Business Cycles: Evidence and Explanations," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 23-44, Spring.
    8. Bresnahan, Timothy & Richards, John, 1999. "Local and Global Competition in Information Technology," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 336-371, December.
    9. Sheffrin, Steven M., 1988. "Have economic fluctuations been dampened? : A look at evidence outside the United States," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 73-83, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gebhard Flaig, 2001. "Gibt es einen »New-Economy-Effekt« auf das amerikanische Produktionspotential?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 54(05), pages 16-21, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wirtschaftswachstum; Produktivität; Europa; Vereinigte Staaten;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ces:ifosdt:v:54:y:2001:i:01:p:15-23. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Klaus Wohlrabe). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifooode.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.