IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bpj/rmeecf/v10y2014i3p28n3.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Economic Policies, Structural Change and the Roots of the “Arab Spring” in Egypt

Author

Listed:
  • Bargawi Hannah

    () (Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, London WC1H 0XG, UK)

Abstract

This paper analyses the economic challenges facing Egypt in the post-Mubarak period, demonstrating the ways in which economic policy choices over the 2000s have contributed to the economic and social outcomes witnessed in the run up to the 2011 uprisings. The article investigates three specific policy areas and demonstrates their role in reducing employment opportunities, eroding wages and facilitating the creation of an increasingly unequal economic and social structure in Egypt. The three policy areas addressed by the article are (i) the general misplaced fiscal focus on expenditure-reduction rather than revenue-enhancement and the lack of progressive revenue growth; (ii) the manipulation and use of subsidies in Egypt to appease the populous instead of fostering employment generation; (iii) the failure to adequately promote employment-intensive investment.

Suggested Citation

  • Bargawi Hannah, 2014. "Economic Policies, Structural Change and the Roots of the “Arab Spring” in Egypt," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 10(3), pages 1-28, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:rmeecf:v:10:y:2014:i:3:p:28:n:3
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/rmeef.2014.10.issue-3/rmeef-2014-0034/rmeef-2014-0034.xml?format=INT
    Download Restriction: For access to full text, subscription to the journal or payment for the individual article is required.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:wbk:wboper:13423 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. World Bank & International Finance Corporation, "undated". "Doing Business in Pakistan 2010," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13435, The World Bank.
    3. World Bank & International Finance Corporation, "undated". "Doing Business in Philippines 2011," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13437, The World Bank.
    4. Tehmina S. Khan & John Norregaard, 2007. "Tax Policy; Recent Trends and Coming Challenges," IMF Working Papers 07/274, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Karim A. Nashashibi, 2002. "Fiscal Revenues in South Mediterranean Arab Countries; Vulnerabilities and Growth Potential," IMF Working Papers 02/67, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Angel-Urdinola, Diego F. & Semlali, Amina, 2010. "Labor Markets and School-to-Work Transition in Egypt: Diagnostics, Constraints, and Policy Framework," MPRA Paper 27674, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Gutner, Tammi, 1999. "The political economy of food subsidy reform in Egypt," FCND discussion papers 77, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Gutner, Tammi, 1999. "The political economy of Food subsidy reform in Egypt," FCND briefs 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Herrera, Santiago & Hurlin, Christophe & Zaki, Chahir, 2013. "Why don't banks lend to Egypt's private sector?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 347-356.
    10. World Bank & International Finance Corporation, "undated". "Doing Business in Zanzibar 2010," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13439, The World Bank.
    11. World Bank & International Finance Corporation, "undated". "Doing Business in Colombia 2010," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13426, The World Bank.
    12. repec:wbk:wboper:13436 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Anton Dobronogov & Farrukh Iqbal, 2007. "Economic Growth in Egypt: Constraints and Determinants," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association (AFEA), vol. 9(1), pages 31-66.
    14. Gutner, Tamar, 2002. "The political economy of food subsidy reform: the case of Egypt," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 455-476.
    15. World Bank & International Finance Corporation, "undated". "Doing Business in Nigeria 2010," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13424, The World Bank.
    16. repec:wbk:wboper:13425 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. World Bank, 2013. "World Development Indicators 2013," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13191, December.
    18. repec:wbk:wboper:13434 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. repec:wbk:wboper:13438 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Abdel-Baki Monal A., 2012. "Coalitions within the Egyptian Banking Sector: Catalysts of the Popular Revolution," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 14(1), pages 1-26, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bpj:rmeecf:v:10:y:2014:i:3:p:28:n:3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla). General contact details of provider: https://www.degruyter.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.