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Gender and Educational Variations in the Earnings Premiums of Occupational Credentials

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  • Kim Jeounghee

    (School of Social Work, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, 390 George Street, New Brunswick, 08901, NJ, USA)

  • Chatterji Sangeeta

    (Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, 21205, MD, USA)

Abstract

Occupational credentials such as professional licenses and certifications are known to generate significant earnings premiums. Based on this, the federal workforce development policy focuses on industry-recognized occupational credentials for less-educated adults to help them obtain family-supporting jobs without having to invest in a postsecondary degree. This study used data from the 2016–2019 Current Population Survey (CPS) outgoing rotation group samples to examine differences in the earnings premiums associated with occupational credentials by gender and education. Our analyses revealed that the earnings premium of job-required credential holding was greater for women than men. For women, estimates of the earnings premiums do not vary much by education level, while for men, those without a Bachelor's degree tend to have high premiums than those without.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim Jeounghee & Chatterji Sangeeta, 2020. "Gender and Educational Variations in the Earnings Premiums of Occupational Credentials," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(3), pages 1-21, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:20:y:2020:i:3:p:21:n:2
    DOI: 10.1515/bejeap-2019-0187
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    References listed on IDEAS

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