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Intergenerational Income Mobility in a Less-Developed, High-Inequality Context: The Case of Chile

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  • Nunez Javier I

    () (University of Chile)

  • Miranda Leslie

    () (University of Chile)

Abstract

This paper studies the magnitude of intergenerational income mobility in less developed, high inequality Chile. Following a known methodology where fathers' incomes are predicted from standard income determinants such as education and occupation, we get comparable estimates of the intergenerational income elasticity in the range of 0.57 to 0.74 and 0.63 to 0.76 for ages 25-40 and 31-40, respectively. These values place Chile at the high end of the available international evidence. Considering Chile's high income inequality, this finding supports the hypothesis proposed in the literature of an inverse relationship between cross-sectional income inequality and intergenerational income mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Nunez Javier I & Miranda Leslie, 2010. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in a Less-Developed, High-Inequality Context: The Case of Chile," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-17, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:10:y:2010:i:1:n:33
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Quheng Deng & Björn Gustafsson & Shi Li, 2013. "Intergenerational Income Persistence in Urban China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59(3), pages 416-436, September.
    2. Kan Kamhon & Li I-Hsin & Wang Ruei-Hua, 2015. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in Taiwan: Evidence from TS2SLS and Structural Quantile Regression," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(1), pages 1-28, January.
    3. David Fairbrother & Renuka Mahadevan, 2016. "Do Education and Sex Matter for Intergenerational Earnings Mobility? Some Evidence from Australia," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 212-226, September.
    4. Piraino, Patrizio, 2015. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility and Equality of Opportunity in South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 396-405.
    5. Viktoria Hnatkovska & Amartya Lahiri & Sourabh B. Paul, 2013. "Breaking the Caste Barrier: Intergenerational Mobility in India," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(2), pages 435-473.
    6. Agostini, Claudio A. & Jiménez, Johanna, 2015. "The distributional incidence of the gasoline tax in Chile," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 243-252.
    7. Sajid Amin Javed & Mohammad Irfan, 2014. "Intergenerational Mobility: Evidence from Pakistan Panel Household Survey," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 53(2), pages 175-203.
    8. Dang, Thang, 2015. "Intergenerational mobility of earnings and income among sons and daughters in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 75357, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Fengye Sun & Atsuko Ueda, 2015. "Intergenerational earnings mobility in Taiwan," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(1), pages 187-197.

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