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Gender And Financial Risk: The U.S. And Brazil

Listed author(s):
  • BARBER Dennis III

    (Department of Economics, Armstrong State University, Savannah, GA USA)

  • SAADATMAND Yassaman

    (Department of Economics, Armstrong State University, Savannah, GA USA)

  • KAVOORI Thomas

    (Department of Economics, Armstrong State University, Savannah, GA USA)

This study intends to add to the debate whether differences in risk behaviours exist between genders. These results are used to inform the conversation about the role of gender in management and leadership. The design is an investment game in which participants could gain or lose money from investing in a hypothetical risky asset. Participants were first paid $10 to complete a survey. They could then invest any or all of this $10 in a risky asset with a known probability of gaining and losing. After winnings from the first round of investments were dispersed, a second chance to invest in the same asset was offered. The findings suggest that there is no difference between genders in their willingness to invest into the risky asset. This held true for the pooled data and for the U.S. and Brazil data separately. It is often assumed that the inherent risk behaviours differs between genders and, often times, this information is used when making promotion or hiring decisions. The methodology offers a unique approach to measuring financial risk taking at an individual level. The investment game included salient rewards and subjects were in a setting where other factors could be controlled.

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File URL: http://eccsf.ulbsibiu.ro/RePEc/blg/journl/11102barber&saadatmand&kavoori.pdf
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Article provided by Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences in its journal Studies in Business and Economics.

Volume (Year): 11 (2016)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages: 15-25

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Handle: RePEc:blg:journl:v:11:y:2016:i:1:p:15-25
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences Dumbravii Avenue, No 17, postal code 550324, Sibiu, Romania

Phone: 004 0269 210375
Fax: 004 0269 210375
Web page: http://economice.ulbsibiu.ro/
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  1. Smith, Nina & Smith, Valdemar & Verner, Mette, 2005. "Do Women in Top Management Affect Firm Performance? A Panel Study of 2500 Danish Firms," IZA Discussion Papers 1708, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  3. Kevin Campbell & Antonio Mínguez-Vera, 2008. "Gender Diversity in the Boardroom and Firm Financial Performance," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 83(3), pages 435-451, December.
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  6. Christine R. Harris & Michael Jenkins & Dale Glaser, 2006. "Gender differences in risk assessment: Why do women take fewer risks than men?," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 1, pages 48-63, July.
  7. Ana María Muñoz Boudet & Patti Petesch & Carolyn Turk & Angélica Thumala, 2013. "On Norms and Agency : Conversations about Gender Equality with Women and Men in 20 Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13818, September.
  8. McGrath, Rita Gunther & MacMillan, Ian C. & Scheinberg, Sari, 1992. "Elitists, risk-takers, and rugged individualists? An exploratory analysis of cultural differences between entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 115-135, March.
  9. Dennis Barber, 2015. "An experimental analysis of risk and entrepreneurial attitudes of university students in the USA and Brazil," Journal of International Entrepreneurship, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 370-389, December.
  10. Rachel Croson & Uri Gneezy, 2009. "Gender Differences in Preferences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 448-474, June.
  11. Stanley M. Atkinson & Samantha Boyce Baird & Melissa B. Frye, 2003. "Do Female Mutual Fund Managers Manage Differently?," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 26(1), pages 1-18.
  12. Charness, Gary & Gneezy, Uri, 2012. "Strong Evidence for Gender Differences in Risk Taking," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 50-58.
  13. David A. Carter & Betty J. Simkins & W. Gary Simpson, 2003. "Corporate Governance, Board Diversity, and Firm Value," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 38(1), pages 33-53, 02.
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