IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/scotjp/v46y1999i2p185-206.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Seasonality, Cointegration, and Forecasting UK Residential Energy Demand

Author

Listed:
  • Clements, Michael P
  • Madlener, Reinhard

Abstract

Much of the short-run movement in energy demand in the United Kingdom is seasonal, and the contribution of long- run factors to short-run forecasts is slight. Nevertheless, using a variety of techniques, including a recently developed estimation procedure that is applicable irrespective of the orders of integration of the data, the authors obtain a long-run income elasticity of demand of about one third, and they are unable to reject a zero price elasticity. An econometric model is shown to provide superior short-run forecasts to well-known seasonal time series models ex post, but is inferior to Box-Jenkins SARMA models when the determinants themselves have to be forecast. However, the relatively short data sample and small number of forecasts suggest caution in generalizing these results. Copyright 1999 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Clements, Michael P & Madlener, Reinhard, 1999. "Seasonality, Cointegration, and Forecasting UK Residential Energy Demand," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 46(2), pages 185-206, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:46:y:1999:i:2:p:185-206
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showTOC&journalCode=sjpe&volume=46&issue=2&year=1999&part=null
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zachariadis, Theodoros & Hadjinicolaou, Panos, 2014. "The effect of climate change on electricity needs – A case study from Mediterranean Europe," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 899-910.
    2. repec:pje:journl:article11ii is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Noel Alter & Shabib Haider Syed, 2011. "An Empirical Analysis of Electricity Demand in Pakistan," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 1(4), pages 116-139.
    4. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell & Prasad, Arti, 2007. "Electricity consumption in G7 countries: A panel cointegration analysis of residential demand elasticities," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 4485-4494, September.
    5. Lester C. Hunt & Guy Judge & Yashushi Ninomiya, 2000. "Modelling Technical Progress: An Application of the Stochastic Trend Model to UK Energy Demand," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 99, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    6. Maria Jesus Herrerias and Eric Girardin, 2013. "Seasonal Patterns of Energy in China," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    7. Jamil, Faisal & Ahmad, Eatzaz, 2011. "Income and price elasticities of electricity demand: Aggregate and sector-wise analyses," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 5519-5527, September.
    8. Hunt, Lester C. & Judge, Guy & Ninomiya, Yasushi, 2003. "Underlying trends and seasonality in UK energy demand: a sectoral analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 93-118, January.
    9. Zachariadis, Theodoros & Pashourtidou, Nicoletta, 2007. "An empirical analysis of electricity consumption in Cyprus," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 183-198, March.
    10. Zachariadis, Theodoros, 2010. "Forecast of electricity consumption in Cyprus up to the year 2030: The potential impact of climate change," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 744-750, February.
    11. Hondroyiannis, George, 2004. "Estimating residential demand for electricity in Greece," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 319-334, May.
    12. Zachariadis, Theodoros & Poullikkas, Andreas, 2012. "The costs of power outages: A case study from Cyprus," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 630-641.
    13. Herrerias, M.J., 2013. "Seasonal anomalies in electricity intensity across Chinese regions," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1548-1557.
    14. Bhattacharyya, Subhes C. & Timilsina, Govinda R., 2010. "Modelling energy demand of developing countries: Are the specific features adequately captured?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 1979-1990, April.
    15. Mudassir Zaman & Farzana Shaheen & Azad Haider & Sadia Qamar, 2015. "Examining Relationship between Electricity Consumption and its Major Determinants in Pakistan," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(4), pages 998-1009.
    16. Muhammad Arshad Khan & Abdul Qayyum, 2009. "The demand for electricity in Pakistan," OPEC Energy Review, Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, vol. 33(1), pages 70-96, March.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:46:y:1999:i:2:p:185-206. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/sesssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.