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Military Spending, Investment And Economic Growth In Small Industrialising Economies

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  • JP Dunne & E Nikolaidou & R Smith, 2002. "Military Spending, Investment And Economic Growth In Small Industrialising Economies," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 70(5), pages 789-790, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:sajeco:v:70:y:2002:i:5:p:789-790
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1813-6982.2002.tb00045.x
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    1. Jan Willem Gunning & Paul Collier, 1999. "Explaining African Economic Performance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 64-111, March.
    2. Malcolm Knight & Norman Loayza & Delano Villanueva, 1996. "The Peace Dividend: Military Spending Cuts and Economic Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 43(1), pages 1-37, March.
    3. Smith, Ronald P., 1980. "Military expenditure and investment in OECD countries, 1954-1973," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 19-32, March.
    4. Jonathan Temple, 1999. "The New Growth Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 112-156, March.
    5. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Smith, Ron, 1995. "Estimating long-run relationships from dynamic heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 79-113, July.
    6. Lee, Kevin & Pesaran, M Hashem & Smith, Ron, 1997. "Growth and Convergence in Multi-country Empirical Stochastic Solow Model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(4), pages 357-392, July-Aug..
    7. Dunne, Paul, 1990. "The Political Economy of Military Expenditure: An Introduction," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(4), pages 395-404, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. J Paul Dunne, 2011. "Military Keynesianism: An Assessment," Working Papers 1106, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    2. Charles Shaaba Saba & Nicholas Ngepah, 2019. "A cross-regional analysis of military expenditure, state fragility and economic growth in Africa," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 53(6), pages 2885-2915, November.
    3. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan, 2014. "Military Spending and Economic Growth: The Case of Iran," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 247-269, June.
    4. Brian J. Phillips, 2015. "Civil war, spillover and neighbors’ military spending," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 32(4), pages 425-442, September.
    5. Muhammad Shahbaz & Talat Afza & Muhammad Shahbaz Shabbir, 2013. "Does Defence Spending Impede Economic Growth? Cointegration And Causality Analysis For Pakistan," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 105-120, April.
    6. Luca Pieroni, 2007. "How Strong is the Relationship between Defence Expenditure and Private Consumption? Evidence from the United States," Working Papers 0705, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    7. Goodness C. Aye & Mehmet Balcilar & John P. Dunne & Rangan Gupta & Rene� van Eyden, 2014. "Military expenditure, economic growth and structural instability: a case study of South Africa," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(6), pages 619-633, December.
    8. Nusrate Aziz & Usman Khalid, 2019. "Armed Conflict, Military Expenses and FDI Inflow to Developing Countries," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(2), pages 238-251, February.
    9. Biyase, Mduduzi & Malesa, Mokgadi, 2019. "Life Expectancy and Economic Growth: Evidence from the Southern African Development Community," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 72(3), pages 351-366.
    10. J. Paul Dunne & Ron P. Smith, 2020. "Military Expenditure, Investment and Growth," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(6), pages 601-614, August.
    11. Jomon A. Paul & Aniruddha Bagchi, 2019. "Civil Liberties and Terrorism in Middle East, North Africa, Afghanistan, and Pakistan," Annals of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 275(2), pages 623-651, April.
    12. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2015. "Military Expenditure, Economic Growth and Heterogeneity," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 15-31, February.
    13. Bragoudakis Zacharias G. & Zombanakis George A., 2017. "Earning a Peace Dividend in a Crisis Environment: The Greek Case," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 23(3), pages 1-15, August.
    14. Nusrate Aziz & M. Niaz Asadullah, 2017. "Military spending, armed conflict and economic growth in developing countries in the post-Cold War era," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 44(1), pages 47-68, January.
    15. Jülide Yildirim & Nadir Öcal, 2016. "Military expenditures, economic growth and spatial spillovers," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 87-104, February.
    16. Rati Ram, 2006. "Defense Expenditure and Economic Growth: Evidence from Cross-Country Panel Data," Chapters, in: Attiat F. Ott & Richard J. Cebula (ed.),The Elgar Companion to Public Economics, chapter 11, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    17. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2007. "The Military Expenditure-External Debt Nexus: New Evidence From A Panel Of Middle Eastern Countries," Monash Economics Working Papers 17-07, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    18. Garfinkel, Michelle R. & Skaperdas, Stergios (ed.), 2012. "The Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Peace and Conflict," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195392777.
    19. Usman Khalid & Luke Emeka Okafor & Nusrate Aziz, 2020. "Armed conflict, military expenditure and international tourism," Tourism Economics, , vol. 26(4), pages 555-577, June.
    20. J. Paul Dunne & Nan Tian, 2019. "Military Expenditures and Economic Growth," School of Economics Macroeconomic Discussion Paper Series 2019-05, School of Economics, University of Cape Town.

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