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The Political Economy of Military Expenditure: An Introduction

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  • Dunne, Paul

Abstract

This paper shows that, although the military burden has declined since the Korean War, in the OECD it still represents an important component of government spending. The magnitude of military spending does not provide a measure of its importance to the economy. The relation between military spending and accumulation has to be seen as a complex historical dialectical process in which military spending plays a contradictory role. The other contributions to the symposium are then discussed within this framework. They deal with the empirical analysis of the economic costs of military spending, the impact of changing military spending, and the problems of conversion. Copyright 1990 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Dunne, Paul, 1990. "The Political Economy of Military Expenditure: An Introduction," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(4), pages 395-404, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:14:y:1990:i:4:p:395-404
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    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    2. Christopher Adam & David Vines, 2009. "Remaking macroeconomic policy after the global financial crisis: a balance-sheet approach," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(4), pages 507-552, Winter.
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    5. Krugman, Paul, 1979. "A Model of Balance-of-Payments Crises," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 11(3), pages 311-325, August.
    6. Dosi, Giovanni & Fagiolo, Giorgio & Roventini, Andrea, 2010. "Schumpeter meeting Keynes: A policy-friendly model of endogenous growth and business cycles," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1748-1767, September.
    7. José Gabriel Palma, 2009. "The revenge of the market on the rentiers," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(4), pages 829-869, July.
    8. Amable, Bruno, 2003. "The Diversity of Modern Capitalism," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199261147.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tony Addison & Alemayehu Geda & Philippe Le Billon & S Mansoob Murshed, 2005. "Reconstructing and Reforming the Financial System in Conflict and 'Post-Conflict' Economies," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(4), pages 703-718.
    2. Emmanuel Athanassiou & Christos Kollias & Stavros Zografakis, 2002. "The Effects of Defence Spending Reductions: A CGE Estimation of the Foregone Peace Dividend in the Case of Greece," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 109-119.
    3. Gulay Gunluk-Senesen, 2002. "Budgetary trade-offs of security expenditures in Turkey," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(5), pages 385-403.
    4. J Paul Dunne, 2011. "Military Keynesianism: An Assessment," Working Papers 1106, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    5. Giha Tobar, Yaneth & Riveros Reyes, Héctor & Soto Velasco, Andrés, 1999. "Military expenditure in Colombia: macroeconomic and microeconomic aspects," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), December.
    6. Kollias, Christos & Paleologou, Suzanna-Maria, 2013. "Guns, highways and economic growth in the United States," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 449-455.
    7. Jurgen Brauer & J Paul Dunne, 2005. "Arms Trade Offsets and Development," Working Papers 0504, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    8. Pieroni, Luca, 2009. "Does defence expenditure affect private consumption? Evidence from the United States," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1300-1309, November.
    9. Christos Kollias & Thanasis Maniatis, 2003. "Military expenditure and the profit rate in Greece," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 117-127.
    10. Paul Dunne & Duncan Watson, 2005. "Manufacturing Growth, Technological Progress, and Military Expenditure," Working Papers 0511, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    11. Luca Pieroni, 2007. "How Strong is the Relationship between Defence Expenditure and Private Consumption? Evidence from the United States," Working Papers 0705, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    12. Dietrich Fischer & Jurgen Brauer, 2003. "Twenty questions for peace economics: A research agenda," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 223-236.

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