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Household Saving And Portfolio Change: Evidence From The 1983–89 Scf Panel

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  • Arthur B. Kennickell
  • Martha Starr‐Mccluer

Abstract

There are few sources of high‐quality data on the dynamics of wealth accumulation. This paper uses newly available data from the 1983 89 panel of the Survey of Consumer Finances to examine household saving and portfolio change over the 1980s. Our main findings are as follows. First, median household wealth rose modestly over the period. Second, while overall wealth inequality increased, households in the top 1 percent of the wealth distribution in 1983 saw their share of total wealth decline, probably reflecting turnover among the very wealthy. Third, although age, income, and initial wealth had significant effects in regressions on household saving, a large part of the variation in saving was unexplained. Finally, there were clear life‐cycle patterns in the portfolios of assets and liabilities held by households, with younger households acquiring homes, businesses and all types of debts, and older households divesting themselves of these assets and debts.

Suggested Citation

  • Arthur B. Kennickell & Martha Starr‐Mccluer, 1997. "Household Saving And Portfolio Change: Evidence From The 1983–89 Scf Panel," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 43(4), pages 381-399, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:43:y:1997:i:4:p:381-399
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4991.1997.tb00232.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-4991.1997.tb00232.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eric M. Engen & William G. Gale & John Karl Scholz, 1994. "Do Saving Incentives Work?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 25(1), pages 85-180.
    2. Lupton, J. & Smith, J.P., 1999. "Marriage, Assets, and Savings," Papers 99-12, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maury Gittleman & Edward N. Wolff, 2004. "Racial Differences in Patterns of Wealth Accumulation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(1).
    2. Ji, Tingting, 2004. "Consumer Credit Delinquency And Bankruptcy Forecasting Using Advanced Econometrc Modeling," MPRA Paper 3187, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Arthur B. Kennickell, 2003. "A Rolling Tide: Changes in the Distribution of Wealth in the US, 1989-2001," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_393, Levy Economics Institute.
    4. Kaminoyama, Ken-ichi & Kawagishi, Taketo, 2012. "Cash-in-advance constraint with status in a neoclassical growth model," MPRA Paper 38382, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Andrea Neri, 2009. "Measuring wealth mobility," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 703, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    6. Díaz Serrano, Luis & Ferrer Carbonell, Ada & Hartog, Joop, 2009. "Risk Attitude And Wage Growth: Replication And Reconstruction," Working Papers 2072/42897, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    7. Daniel Sandoval & Mark Rank & Thomas Hirschl, 2009. "The increasing risk of poverty across the American life course," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(4), pages 717-737, November.
    8. Fischer, Thomas, 2019. "Determinants of Wealth Inequality and Mobility in General Equilibrium," Working Papers 2019:22, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    9. Karen Pence & John Sabelhaus, 1999. "Household Saving in the '90s: Evidence from Cross-Section Wealth Surveys: Technical Paper 1999-3," Working Papers 13345, Congressional Budget Office.
    10. Edward N. Wolff, "undated". "Racial Wealth Disparities Is the Gap Closing?," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_66, Levy Economics Institute.
    11. Atreya Chakraborty & Mark Kazarosian, 1999. "Portfolio Allocation of Precautionary Assets: Panel Evidence for the United States," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 432, Boston College Department of Economics.
    12. Alan L. Gustman & Olivia S. Mitchell & Andrew A. Samwick & Thomas L. Steinmeier, "undated". "Pension and Social Security Wealth in the Health and Retirement Study," Pension Research Council Working Papers 97-3, Wharton School Pension Research Council, University of Pennsylvania.
    13. Barry P. Bosworth & Ralph C. Bryant & Gary Burtless, 2004. "The Impact of Aging on Financial Markets and the Economy: A Survey," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College 2004-23, Center for Retirement Research.

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