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Liliput oder Leviathan? Der Staat in der globalisierten Wirtschaft

  • Bruno S. Frey

Globalization is often seen to result in a smaller (Lilliput) or larger (Leviathan) state. But future public activity will be more flexible. People have multiple identities. They can be citizens of sub- and supra-national jurisdictions, semi- and non-governmental organizations and private units, even profit-oriented firms. Such attachment may be temporary, multiple or partial. To actively choose strengthens loyalty and identification, which raises the willingness to pay for publicly supplied services (in the sense of quasi-voluntary taxation). On the supply side, Functional, Overlapping and Competing Jurisdictions (FOCJ) will develop. Such flexibility of future European integration will make it successful. Copyright Verein für Socialpolitik und Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2002

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Article provided by Verein für Socialpolitik in its journal Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik.

Volume (Year): 3 (2002)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 363-375

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Handle: RePEc:bla:perwir:v:3:y:2002:i:4:p:363-375
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  1. Kjetil Bjorvatn & Guttorm Schjelderup, 2000. "Tax Competition and International Public Goods," CESifo Working Paper Series 390, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Baldwin, Richard & Krugman, Paul, 2000. "Agglomeration, Integration and Tax Harmonization," CEPR Discussion Papers 2630, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Alm, James & McClelland, Gary H. & Schulze, William D., 1992. "Why do people pay taxes?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 21-38, June.
  4. Andreoni, J. & Erard, B. & Feinstein, J., 1996. "Tax Compliance," Working papers 9610r, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  5. Samuel Bowles, 1998. "Endogenous Preferences: The Cultural Consequences of Markets and Other Economic Institutions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 75-111, March.
  6. Samuel Bowles & Herbert Gintis, 2000. "The Evolution of Strong Reciprocity," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2000-05, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
  7. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2000. "Economics And Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(3), pages 715-753, August.
  8. Berthold, Norbert & Neumann, Michael, 2001. "Sozialsysteme im Wettbewerb - das Ende der Umverteilung?," Discussion Paper Series 41, Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg, Chair of Economic Order and Social Policy.
  9. Bernholz, Peter, 2000. "Globalisierung und Umstrukturierung der Wirtschaft: Sind sie neu?," Walter Adolf Jöhr Lecture 2000, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science, Institute of Economics (FGN-HSG).
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