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Globalization, Financial Development and Income Inequality

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  • Hiroshi Daisaka
  • Taiji Furusawa
  • Noriyuki Yanagawa

Abstract

We analyse the effect of financial development and globalization (i.e. the reduction of trade costs) on income distribution when a financial institution is imperfect. Financial imperfection creates income inequality, by benefiting borrowers (entrepreneurs) and harming lenders through its effect of lowering the capital rental rate. We show that globalization changes income for both borrowers and lenders in the same direction. However, the poorer is the financial institution, the greater its effect for entrepreneurs and the smaller for lenders. We also examine the effect of financial development and globalization in an enriched model where individuals are different in their abilities as well as their capital endowments. We show that financial development mitigates capital misallocation while the reduction of trade costs will not improve efficiency.

Suggested Citation

  • Hiroshi Daisaka & Taiji Furusawa & Noriyuki Yanagawa, 2014. "Globalization, Financial Development and Income Inequality," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(5), pages 612-633, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:pacecr:v:19:y:2014:i:5:p:612-633
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/1468-0106.12086
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    Cited by:

    1. Kamila Tureckova, 2015. "Income Inequality By Method Of Non-Weighted Average Absolute Deviation: Case Study Of Central And Eastern European Countries*," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 10(4), pages 99-110, December.
    2. Chiu, Yi-Bin & Lee, Chien-Chiang, 2019. "Financial development, income inequality, and country risk," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 1-18.
    3. Makoto Yano & Takashi Komatsubara, 2014. "Participation of Ordinary Investors and Stock Market Quality: A Comparison between Japanese and US Markets," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(5), pages 537-558, December.
    4. YOUNSI, Moheddine & BECHTINI, Marwa, 2018. "Economic Growth, Financial Development and Income Inequality in BRICS Countries: Evidence from Panel Granger Causality Tests," MPRA Paper 85182, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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