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Institutions and moral hazard in open economies

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  • Vogel, Jonathan

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  • Vogel, Jonathan, 2007. "Institutions and moral hazard in open economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 495-514, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:inecon:v:71:y:2007:i:2:p:495-514
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    2. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2005. "Credit Market Imperfections and Patterns of International Trade and Capital Flows," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 714-723, 04/05.
    3. Michael Kremer, 1993. "The O-Ring Theory of Economic Development," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 551-575.
    4. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    5. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2002. "Reversal of Fortune: Geography and Institutions in the Making of the Modern World Income Distribution," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1231-1294.
    6. repec:bin:bpeajo:v:24:y:1993:i:1993-2m:p:161-226 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Gene M. Grossman, 2004. "The Distribution of Talent and the Pattern and Consequences of International Trade," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(1), pages 209-239, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Costinot, Arnaud, 2009. "On the origins of comparative advantage," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 255-264, April.
    2. Costinot, Arnaud & Komunjer, Ivana, 2006. "What Goods Do Countries Trade? New Ricardian Predictions," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt86n316hw, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    3. Marianna Belloc & Samuel Bowles, 2009. "International Trade, Factor Mobility and the Persistence of Cultural-Institutional Diversity," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2009-08, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    4. Arnaud Costinot, 2009. "An Elementary Theory of Comparative Advantage," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(4), pages 1165-1192, July.
    5. Pol Antràs & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2009. "Organizations and Trade," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 43-64, May.
    6. Fałkowski, Jan & Curzi, Daniele & Olper, Alessandro, 2016. "Contract (in)completeness, product quality and trade – evidence from the food industry," 2016 Fifth AIEAA Congress, June 16-17, 2016, Bologna, Italy 242321, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
    7. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2008. "Aggregate Implications of Credit Market Imperfections," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2007, Volume 22, pages 1-60 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Emily Blanchard & William W. Olney, 2013. "Globalization and Human Capital Investment: How Export Composition Drives Educational Attainment," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-18, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Mar 2015.
    9. Hiroshi Daisaka & Taiji Furusawa & Noriyuki Yanagawa, 2014. "Globalization, Financial Development and Income Inequality," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(5), pages 612-633, December.
    10. Davidson, Carl & Sly, Nicholas, 2014. "A simple model of globalization, schooling and skill acquisition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 209-227.
    11. Dhimitri Qirjo, 2015. "Monitoring, endogenous comparative advantage, and immigration," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-22, December.
    12. Yanhui Wu, 2011. "Managerial Incentives and Compensation in a Global Market," CEP Discussion Papers dp1066, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    13. Sly, Nicholas, 2010. "Skill Acquisition, Incentive Contracts and Jobs: Labor Market Adjustment to Trade," MPRA Paper 25004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. repec:eee:inecon:v:106:y:2017:i:c:p:165-183 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Yang Jiao & Shang-Jin Wei, 2017. "Intrinsic Openness and Endogenous Institutional Quality," NBER Working Papers 24052, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Chahir Zaki & Fida Karam, 2017. "Why Don’t MENA Countries Trade More? The Curse of Bad Institutions," Working Papers 1148, Economic Research Forum, revised 10 2003.
    17. repec:kap:copoec:v:28:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10602-016-9224-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Blanchard, Emily & Willmann, Gerald, 2016. "Trade, education, and the shrinking middle class," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 263-278.
    19. Daniel Chiquiar & Manuel Ramos Francia, 2009. "Competitiveness and Growth of the Mexican Economy," Working Papers 2009-11, Banco de México.
    20. Rosemary Walker & Liviu Florea, 2014. "Easy-Come-Easy-Go: Moral Hazard in the Context of Return to Education," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 120(2), pages 201-217, March.

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