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Trade, the Staple Theory of Growth, and Fluctuations in Colonial Singapore, 1900–39

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  • Keen Meng Choy
  • Ichiro Sugimoto

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  • Keen Meng Choy & Ichiro Sugimoto, 2013. "Trade, the Staple Theory of Growth, and Fluctuations in Colonial Singapore, 1900–39," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 53(2), pages 121-145, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ozechr:v:53:y:2013:i:2:p:121-145
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/aehr.12007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Reuven Glick & Alan M. Taylor, 2010. "Collateral Damage: Trade Disruption and the Economic Impact of War," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(1), pages 102-127, February.
    2. Dean Corbae & Sam Ouliaris & Peter C. B. Phillips, 2002. "Band Spectral Regression with Trending Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(3), pages 1067-1109, May.
    3. W.G. Huff, 2001. "Entitlements, destitution, and emigration in the 1930s Singapore great depression[An earlier]," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 54(2), pages 290-323, May.
    4. Marianne Baxter & Robert G. King, 1999. "Measuring Business Cycles: Approximate Band-Pass Filters For Economic Time Series," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 575-593, November.
    5. Lewis, W Arthur, 1980. "The Slowing Down of the Engine of Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(4), pages 555-564, September.
    6. Kravis, Irving B, 1970. "Trade as a Handmaiden of Growth: Similarities between the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 80(323), pages 850-872, December.
    7. Backus, David K & Kehoe, Patrick J, 1992. "International Evidence of the Historical Properties of Business Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 864-888, September.
    8. King, Robert G. & Plosser, Charles I. & Rebelo, Sergio T., 1988. "Production, growth and business cycles : II. New directions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 309-341.
    9. Blattman, Christopher & Hwang, Jason & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2007. "Winners and losers in the commodity lottery: The impact of terms of trade growth and volatility in the Periphery 1870-1939," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 156-179, January.
    10. Ichiro Sugimoto, 2011. "ECONOMIC GROWTH OF SINGAPORE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY:Historical GDP Estimates and Empirical Investigations," World Scientific Books, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., volume 2, number 7858, March.
    11. W.G. Huff, 2000. "Shipping Monopoly, Monopsony and Business Group Organization in Pre-World War Two Singapore," Asia Pacific Business Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 63-78, December.
    12. Victor Zarnowitz, 1992. "Business Cycles: Theory, History, Indicators, and Forecasting," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number zarn92-1, April.
    13. Cogley, Timothy & Nason, James M., 1995. "Effects of the Hodrick-Prescott filter on trend and difference stationary time series Implications for business cycle research," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 253-278.
    14. Mendoza, Enrique G., 1997. "Terms-of-trade uncertainty and economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 323-356, December.
    15. Morris Altman, 2003. "Staple theory and export-led growth: constructing differential growth," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 43(3), pages 230-255, November.
    16. King, Robert G. & Plosser, Charles I. & Rebelo, Sergio T., 1988. "Production, growth and business cycles : I. The basic neoclassical model," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 195-232.
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    Cited by:

    1. Atsushi Kobayashi, 2017. "Price Fluctuations and Growth Patterns in Singapore's Trade, 1831–1913," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 57(1), pages 108-129, March.

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