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Staple theory and export-led growth: constructing differential growth

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  • Morris Altman

Abstract

The staple theory is a subset of the export-led growth hypothesis, designed to explain the growth and economic development of resource-rich economies. It is a theory that has been misunderstood and is seen to be at odds with the stylised facts of economic growth and development as well as with mainstream neoclassical wisdom. This article presents a brief and critical historiography of the staple theory from which a simple model of staple growth and development is gleaned. As well, data are presented which suggest that staple theory remains an important analytical tool to help explain economic development and growth. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and the Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand 2003.

Suggested Citation

  • Morris Altman, 2003. "Staple theory and export-led growth: constructing differential growth," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 43(3), pages 230-255, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ozechr:v:43:y:2003:i:3:p:230-255
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    Cited by:

    1. Nasri Harb, 2009. "Oil Exports, Non-Oil GDP, and Investment in the GCC Countries," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(4), pages 695-708, November.
    2. Vincent Geloso & Vadim Kufenko & Klaus Prettner, 2016. "Demographic change and regional convergence in Canada," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(4), pages 1904-1910.
    3. Bassino, Jean-Pascal & Coclanis, Peter A., 2008. "Economic transformation and biological welfare in colonial Burma: Regional differentiation in the evolution of average height," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 212-227, July.
    4. Keen Meng Choy & Ichiro Sugimoto, 2013. "Trade, the Staple Theory of Growth, and Fluctuations in Colonial Singapore, 1900–39," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 53(2), pages 121-145, July.
    5. Henry Willebald & Marc Badia-Miró & Vicente Pinilla, 2015. "Natural Resources and Economic Development. Some lessons from History," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1504, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    6. Daniela Russi & Ana C. Gonzalez-Martinez & José Carlos Silva-Macher & Stefan Giljum & Joan Martínez-Alier & Maria Cristina Vallejo, 2008. "Material Flows in Latin America," Journal of Industrial Ecology, Yale University, vol. 12(5-6), pages 704-720, October.
    7. Xavier Tafunell & Cristián Ducoing, 2015. "Non-residential capital stock in Latin America. 1875-2008," Economics Working Papers 1472, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    8. Szostak, Rick, 2006. "Economic history as it is and should be: Toward an open, honest, methodologically flexible, theoretically diverse, interdisciplinary exploration of the causes and consequences of economic growth," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 727-750, August.
    9. Xavier Tafunell & Cristián Ducoing, 2016. "Non-Residential Capital Stock in Latin America, 1875–2008: New Estimates and International Comparisons," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(1), pages 46-69, March.
    10. Rajabrata Banerjee & Martin Shanahan, 2016. "The Contribution of Wheat to Australian Agriculture from 1861 to 1939," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(2), pages 125-150, July.
    11. Arsenault Morin, Alex & Geloso, Vincent & Kufenko, Vadim, 2016. "Monopsony and industrial development in nineteenth century Quebec: The impact of seigneurial tenure," Violette Reihe: Schriftenreihe des Promotionsschwerpunkts "Globalisierung und Beschäftigung" 51/2016, University of Hohenheim, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Evangelisches Studienwerk.
    12. Nina Eisenmenger & Jesús Ramos Martín & Heinz Schandl, 2007. "Análisis del metabolismo energético y de materiales de Brasil, Chile y Venezuela," Revista Iberoamericana de Economía Ecológica, Red Iberoamericana de Economía Ecológica, vol. 6, pages 17-39.
    13. González, Germán & Viego, Valentina, 2009. "Argentina-Canada from 1870: Explaining the dynamics of divergence," MPRA Paper 18394, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. David Greasley & Les Oxley, 2009. "The pastoral boom, the rural land market, and long swings in New Zealand economic growth, 1873-1939 -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(2), pages 324-349, May.

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