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Recapitalization of Failed Banks: Some Lessons from the Irish Experience

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  • Patrick Honohan

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  • Patrick Honohan, 2013. "Recapitalization of Failed Banks: Some Lessons from the Irish Experience," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 81, pages 1-15, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:81:y:2013:i::p:1-15
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/manc.12019
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    1. Huw Dixon & Hervé Le Bihan, 2012. "Generalised Taylor and Generalised Calvo Price and Wage Setting: Micro‐evidence with Macro Implications," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(560), pages 532-554, May.
    2. Eichengreen, Barry, 1996. "Golden Fetters: The Gold Standard and the Great Depression, 1919-1939," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195101133.
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    4. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 2010. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Tax Changes: Estimates Based on a New Measure of Fiscal Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 763-801, June.
    5. Lawrence Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Sergio Rebelo, 2011. "When Is the Government Spending Multiplier Large?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 119(1), pages 78-121.
    6. Chadha,Jagjit S. & Holly,Sean (ed.), 2011. "Interest Rates, Prices and Liquidity," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107014732.
    7. Andreas Park & Hamid Sabourian, 2011. "Herding and Contrarian Behavior in Financial Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(4), pages 973-1026, July.
    8. John Driffill, 2011. "The Future Of Macroeconomics: Introductory Remarks," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 79(s2), pages 1-4, September.
    9. Gauti B. Eggertsson & Paul Krugman, 2012. "Debt, Deleveraging, and the Liquidity Trap: A Fisher-Minsky-Koo Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(3), pages 1469-1513.
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