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Stimulating Employment Growth with Higher Wages? A New Approach to Addressing an Old Controversy


  • Jens Suedekum
  • Uwe Blien


We analyse the impact of wages on employment growth in West German local industries (1993-2002), addressing the tension between cost and potentially offsetting demand side effects. We construct a neutralised regional wage level that is detached from various productivity influences. A positive value implies 'overly high' labour costs, but also high local purchasing power. A subsequent employment growth regression yields significantly negative effects associated with this indicator. Cost push effects dominate, but our estimates suggest that demand side repercussions have a mitigating effect. There is considerable variation across industries, but in no case we find a positive employment reaction. Copyright 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

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  • Jens Suedekum & Uwe Blien, 2007. "Stimulating Employment Growth with Higher Wages? A New Approach to Addressing an Old Controversy," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 441-464, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:60:y:2007:i:3:p:441-464

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ulrich Zierahn, 2012. "The importance of spatial autocorrelation for regional employment growth in Germany," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 32(1), pages 19-43, March.
    2. Camille Logeay & Sabine Stephan & Rudolf Zwiener, 2011. "Driving forces behind the sectoral wage costs differentials in Europe," IMK Working Paper 10-2011, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    3. Khaled Thabet, 2015. "Industrial structure and total factor productivity: the Tunisian manufacturing sector between 1998 and 2004," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(2), pages 639-662, March.
    4. Uwe Blien & Lutz Eigenhueller & Markus Promberger & Norbert Schanne, 2013. "The Shift-Share Regression: An Application to Regional Employ-ment Development," ERSA conference papers ersa13p614, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Raimund Krumm & Harald Strotmann, 2010. "The Impact of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions on Job Creation and Destruction," IAW Discussion Papers 61, Institut für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (IAW).

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