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Don't They Care? Or, Are They Just Unaware? Risk Perception and the Demand for Long-Term Care Insurance

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  • Tian Zhou-Richter
  • Mark J. Browne
  • Helmut Gründl

Abstract

The potential need for long-term care (LTC) is one of the greatest financial risks faced not only by the elderly but also by their adult children, who often provide care or financial assistance. We investigate adult children's role in the demand for LTC insurance. Similar to flood insurance, we find that demand for LTC insurance is low due to low risk perception. The more aware adult children are of the risk, the more likely LTC insurance is to be purchased, either by the children themselves on behalf of their parents or by the parents under the influence of their children. Copyright (c) The Journal of Risk and Insurance, 2010.

Suggested Citation

  • Tian Zhou-Richter & Mark J. Browne & Helmut Gründl, 2010. "Don't They Care? Or, Are They Just Unaware? Risk Perception and the Demand for Long-Term Care Insurance," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 77(4), pages 715-747.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jrinsu:v:77:y:2010:i:4:p:715-747
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth R. MacCrimmon & Donald A. Wehrung, 1990. "Characteristics of Risk Taking Executives," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 36(4), pages 422-435, April.
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    7. Amy Finkelstein & Kathleen McGarry, 2003. "Private Information and its Effect on Market Equilibrium: New Evidence from Long-Term Care Insurance," NBER Working Papers 9957, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    9. David C. Webb, 2009. "Asymmetric Information, Long-Term Care Insurance, and Annuities: The Case for Bundled Contracts," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 76(1), pages 53-85.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mark Browne & Christian Knoller & Andreas Richter, 2015. "Behavioral bias and the demand for bicycle and flood insurance," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 141-160, April.
    2. Cremer, Helmuth & Roeder, Kerstin, 2017. "Social insurance with competitive insurance markets and risk misperception," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 138-147.
    3. Coe, Norma B. & Skira, Meghan M. & Van Houtven, Courtney Harold, 2015. "Long-term care insurance: Does experience matter?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 122-131.
    4. Martin Boyer & Philippe De Donder & Claude Fluet & Marie-Louise Leroux & Pierre-Carl Michaud, 2017. "Long-Term Care Insurance: Knowledge Barriers, Risk Perception and Adverse Selection," NBER Working Papers 23918, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Courbage, Christophe & Eeckhoudt, Louis, 2012. "On insuring and caring for parents’ long-term care needs," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 842-850.
    6. Jacqueline Volkman-Wise, 2015. "Representativeness and managing catastrophe risk," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 51(3), pages 267-290, December.
    7. Jaspersen, Johannes G. & Richter, Andreas, 2015. "The wealth effects of premium subsidies on moral hazard in insurance markets," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 139-153.
    8. Tennyson, Sharon & Yang, Hae Kyung, 2014. "The role of life experience in long-term care insurance decisions," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 175-188.
    9. Cremer, Helmuth & Roeder, Kerstin, 2013. "Long-term care policy, myopia and redistribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 33-43.
    10. Martin Boyer & Franca Glenzer, 2016. "Pensions, annuities, and long-term care insurance: On the impact of risk screening," Cahiers de recherche 1603, Chaire de recherche Industrielle Alliance sur les enjeux économiques des changements démographiques.

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