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Strategy Fads and Competitive Convergence: An Empirical Test for Herd Behavior in Prime-Time Television Programming

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  • Kennedy, Robert E

Abstract

The economics literature contains many theoretical analyses of imitation and differentiation strategies but relatively few empirical studies of these topics. This paper aims to address that shortcoming. I analyze program introductions by television networks and then compare the payoffs to imitative and differentiated introductions. The analysis indicates that the networks imitate each other when introducing new programs and that, on average, imitative introductions underperform differentiated introductions. These results are consistent with theoretical models of herd behavior but are difficult to explain using standard models of spatial competition or the possibility of omitted variable bias. Copyright 2002 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Kennedy, Robert E, 2002. "Strategy Fads and Competitive Convergence: An Empirical Test for Herd Behavior in Prime-Time Television Programming," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 57-84, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jindec:v:50:y:2002:i:1:p:57-84
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    1. repec:kap:revind:v:51:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11151-016-9545-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Feri, Francesco & Meléndez-Jiménez, Miguel A. & Ponti, Giovanni & Vega-Redondo, Fernando, 2011. "Error cascades in observational learning: An experiment on the Chinos game," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 136-146, September.
    3. Pastine, Ivan & Pastine, Tuvana, 2005. "Signal Accuracy and Informational Cascades," CEPR Discussion Papers 5219, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Qihua Liu & Shan Huang & Liyi Zhang, 2016. "The influence of information cascades on online purchase behaviors of search and experience products," Electronic Commerce Research, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 553-580, December.
    5. Dominic Rohner & Anna Winestein & Bruno S. Frey, 2006. "Ich Bin Auch ein Lemming: Herding and Consumption Capital in Arts and Culture," IEW - Working Papers 270, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    6. Stoneman, Paul, 2011. "Soft Innovation: Economics, Product Aesthetics, and the Creative Industries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199697021.
    7. Pastine, Tuvana, 2005. "Social Learning in Continuous Time: When are Informational Cascades More Likely to be Inefficient?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5120, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Jerker Denrell & Christina Fang, 2010. "Predicting the Next Big Thing: Success as a Signal of Poor Judgment," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 56(10), pages 1653-1667, October.
    9. Marion Debruyne & David J. Reibstein, 2005. "Competitor See, Competitor Do: Incumbent Entry in New Market Niches," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 24(1), pages 55-66, December.
    10. Bogaçhan Çelen & Shachar Kariv, 2004. "Distinguishing Informational Cascades from Herd Behavior in the Laboratory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 484-498, June.
    11. repec:spr:manint:v:49:y:2009:i:5:d:10.1007_s11575-009-0010-y is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Jeffery S. McMullen & Dean A. Shepherd & Holger Patzelt, 2009. "Managerial (In)attention to Competitive Threats," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 157-181, March.
    13. repec:bla:sysdyn:v:32:y:2016:i:3-4:p:233-260 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Alicia Barroso & Marco S. Giarratana & Samira Reis & Olav Sorenson, 2016. "Crowding, satiation, and saturation: The days of television series' lives," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(3), pages 565-585, March.
    15. Morone, Andrea & Sandri, Serena & Fiore, Annamaria, 2009. "On the absorbability of informational cascades in the laboratory," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 728-738, October.

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