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Urban Polycentricity and the Costs of Commuting: Evidence from Italian Metropolitan Areas

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  • PAOLO VENERI

Abstract

Polycentricity at the metropolitan scale is perhaps the model of spatial organisation that needs to be investigated more thoroughly as regards its effects on travel. The aim of this paper is to test the role of polycentricity-as well as other spatial characteristics, such as compactness, functional diversification and size-in the costs of commuting, taking into account an external cost component (per-capita CO 2 emissions) and a private cost component (time spent on travelling). The degree of urban polycentricity has been measured by adopting a dynamic approach based on commuting flows and on social network analysis tools. The analysis is carried out using a database of 82 Italian metropolitan areas (MAs). Results show that MAs with a higher degree of polycentricity are more virtuous both in terms of private and external costs of mobility, while the degree of compactness is associated with lower environmental costs but with higher private costs. Size is associated with both higher external and private costs, while the role of functional diversification turns out to be statistically insignificant. Socio-demographics also play a role. Copyright (c) 2010 The Author. Growth and Change (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc..

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  • Paolo Veneri, 2010. "Urban Polycentricity and the Costs of Commuting: Evidence from Italian Metropolitan Areas," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(3), pages 403-429.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:41:y:2010:i:3:p:403-429
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea CIRILLI & Paolo VENERI, 2010. "Spatial Structure and CO2 Emissions Due to Commuting: an Analysis on Italian Urban Areas," Working Papers 353, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    2. Louafi Bouzouina & Nathalie Havet & Pascal Pochet, 2015. "Mobilité quotidienne des actifs résidant en zones urbaines sensibles et accès à l'emploi : Une analyse économétrique à partir de l'Enquête Ménages Déplacements de Lyon," Working Papers halshs-01143900, HAL.
    3. Laurent Denant-Boèmont & Carl Gaigné & Romain Gaté, 2016. "Urban spatial structure, transport-related emissions and welfare," Economics Working Paper Archive (University of Rennes 1 & University of Caen) 2016-18, Center for Research in Economics and Management (CREM), University of Rennes 1, University of Caen and CNRS.
    4. Gabriel M. Ahfeldt & Elisabetta Pietrostefani, 2017. "The Compact City in Empirical Research: A Quantitative Literature Review," SERC Discussion Papers 0215, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    5. repec:eee:trapol:v:65:y:2018:i:c:p:19-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ivan Muñiz Olivera & Carolina Rojas & Carles Busuldu & Alejandro García & Mariana Filipe, 2016. "El impacto de la forma y estructura espacial urbana sobre las emisiones de CO2 en Concepción (Chile). ¿Es compatible una baja densidad residencial con un bajo nivel de emisiones?," Working Papers wpdea1605, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    7. Paolo Veneri & David Burgalassi, 2011. "Questioning Polycentric Development and its Effects. Issues of Definition and Measurement for the Italian NUTS-2 Regions," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(6), pages 1017-1037, January.
    8. Rafael Henrique Moraes Pereira & Tim Schwanen, 2013. "Commute Time in Brazil (1992-2009): Differences Between Metropolitan Areas, by Income Levels and Gender," Discussion Papers 1813a, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
    9. Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt & Elisabetta Pietrostefani, 2017. "The Economic Effects of Density: A Synthesis," SERC Discussion Papers 0210, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    10. Shu‐Hen Chiang, 2012. "The Source of Metropolitan Growth: The Role of Commuting," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(1), pages 143-166, March.
    11. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:596-:d:133464 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Walter Musakwa & Adriaan Niekerk, 2015. "Monitoring sustainable urban development using built-up area indicators: a case study of Stellenbosch, South Africa," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 547-566, June.
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    14. Parthasarathi, Pavithra, 2014. "Network structure and metropolitan mobility," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 7(2), pages 153-168.
    15. Dong Lin & Andrew Allan & Jianqiang Cui, 2016. "Exploring Differences in Commuting Behaviour among Various Income Groups during Polycentric Urban Development in China: New Evidence and Its Implications," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(11), pages 1-17, November.
    16. Ahfeldt, Gabriel M. & Pietrostefani, Elisabetta, 2017. "The compact city in empirical research: A quantitative literature review," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 83638, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    20. Burgalassi, David, 2010. "Defining and measuring polycentric regions: the case of Tuscany," MPRA Paper 25880, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Emili Tortosa-Ausina & Luisa Alamá & Ana M Fuertes-Eugenio & Marta Roig-Casanova, 2011. "Urban spatial structure and economic growth in Spanish metropolitan areas," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1703, European Regional Science Association.
    22. Davide Burgalassi & Tommaso Luzzati, 2015. "Urban spatial structure and environmental emissions: a survey of the literature and some empirical evidence for Italian NUTS-3 regions," Discussion Papers 2015/199, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

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