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Disadvantage across the Generations: What Do We Know about Social and Economic Mobility in Australia?




This paper begins by considering the Australian evidence on intergenerational social and economic mobility in the context of the international literature. Recent evidence from the Youth in Focus project is used to highlight the effects of growing up in socio-economic disadvantage on a range of outcomes for young Australians. Copyright © 2010 The Economic Society of Australia.

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  • Deborah Cobb-Clark, 2010. "Disadvantage across the Generations: What Do We Know about Social and Economic Mobility in Australia?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(s1), pages 13-17, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:86:y:2010:i:s1:p:13-17

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gans, Joshua S. & Leigh, Andrew, 2009. "Born on the first of July: An (un)natural experiment in birth timing," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1-2), pages 246-263, February.
    2. Nicholas S. Souleles & Jonathan A. Parker & David S. Johnson, 2006. "Household Expenditure and the Income Tax Rebates of 2001," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1589-1610, December.
    3. Jonathan A. Parker, 1999. "The Reaction of Household Consumption to Predictable Changes in Social Security Taxes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 959-973, September.
    4. Leigh Andrew, 2012. "How Much Did the 2009 Australian Fiscal Stimulus Boost Demand? Evidence from Household-Reported Spending Effects," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-24, March.
    5. Matthew Brzozowski, 2007. "Welfare Reforms and Consumption among Single Mother Households: Evidence from Canadian Provinces," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 33(2), pages 227-250, June.
    6. Warwick J. McKibbin & Anthony J. Richards, 1988. "Consumption and Permanent Income: The Australian Case," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp8808, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    7. Nicholas S. Souleles, 1999. "The Response of Household Consumption to Income Tax Refunds," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 947-958, September.
    8. Lusardi, Annamaria, 1996. "Permanent Income, Current Income, and Consumption: Evidence from Two Panel Data Sets," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 14(1), pages 81-90, January.
    9. Souleles, Nicholas S., 2002. "Consumer response to the Reagan tax cuts," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 99-120, July.
    10. Gianni La Cava & John Simon, 2003. "A Tale of Two Surveys: Household Debt and Financial Constraints in Australia," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2003-08, Reserve Bank of Australia.
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    Cited by:

    1. Robert Tanton & Honge Gong & Ann Harding, 2011. "Multiple Generation Disadvantage: How Communities Affect the Outcomes of Different Generations," NATSEM Working Paper Series 11/05, University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling.
    2. Silvia Mendolia & Peter Siminski, 2016. "New Estimates of Intergenerational Mobility in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(298), pages 361-373, September.
    3. Murray, Chelsea & Clark, Robert & Mendolia, Silvia & Siminski, Peter, 2017. "Direct Measures of Intergenerational Income Mobility for Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 11020, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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