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Abatement Cost Heterogeneity In Phase I Electric Utilities




The market-based instruments embodied in the Acid Rain Program have been instrumental in the reduction of SO 2 and NO "x" emissions from electric utilities. Economic theory suggests that tradable pollution permit systems encourage polluters to reallocate pollution burdens to take advantage of any differences in marginal abatement costs. Such reallocations improve the efficiency of pollution reduction. This article evaluates the effectiveness of the first phase of the Acid Rain Program in achieving increased homogeneity of marginal abatement costs using an output distance function approach. The results indicate that plants have been successful in adapting to this more flexible regulatory framework. Copyright 2005 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Jon Rezek & Benjamin F. Blair, 2005. "Abatement Cost Heterogeneity In Phase I Electric Utilities," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 23(3), pages 324-340, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:23:y:2005:i:3:p:324-340

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Atkinson, Scott E & Halvorsen, Robert, 1984. "A New Hedonic Technique for Estimating Attribute Demand: An Application to the Demand for Automobile Fuel Efficiency," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(3), pages 417-426, August.
    5. Arguea, Nestor M. & Hsiao, Cheng, 1993. "Econometric issues of estimating hedonic price functions : With an application to the U.S. market for automobiles," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1-2), pages 243-267, March.
    6. Mertens, Yves & Ginsburgh, Victor, 1985. "Product Differentiation and Price Discrimination in the European Community: The Case of Automobiles," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(2), pages 151-166, December.
    7. Cowling, Keith & Cubbin, John, 1971. "Price, Quality and Advertising Competition: An Econometric Investigation of the United Kingdom Car Market," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 38(152), pages 378-394, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Debra Israel, 2007. "Environmental participation in the U.S. sulfur allowance auctions," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 38(3), pages 373-390, November.
    2. Lee, Sang-choon & Oh, Dong-hyun & Lee, Jeong-dong, 2014. "A new approach to measuring shadow price: Reconciling engineering and economic perspectives," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 66-77.
    3. Park, Hojeong & Lim, Jaekyu, 2009. "Valuation of marginal CO2 abatement options for electric power plants in Korea," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1834-1841, May.
    4. Färe, Rolf & Grosskopf, Shawna & Pasurka,, Carl A., 2013. "Tradable permits and unrealized gains from trade," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 416-424.

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