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Tenure Choice with Location Selection: The Case of Hispanic Neighborhoods in Chicago

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  • Maude Toussaint-Comeau
  • Sherrie L. W. Rhine

Abstract

A notable feature of immigration into the United States is the high degree of spatial concentration of different immigrant groups. This article asks the question whether residing in areas with a large proportion of a coethnic group influence the decision to own a home for Hispanics in the Chicago metropolitan area. The results show that Hispanics choose to live in Hispanic enclaves based on relatively homogeneous characteristics, such as recent migration, less English language fluency, and lower income. More years in the United States, higher education attainment, and English language fluency remain strong predictors of homeownership. Individuals are less likely to be homeowners in communities with a larger coethnic concentration, foreign-born residents, or lower-income families. (JEL "C35", "J1", "R12") Copyright 2004 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Maude Toussaint-Comeau & Sherrie L. W. Rhine, 2004. "Tenure Choice with Location Selection: The Case of Hispanic Neighborhoods in Chicago," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(1), pages 95-110, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:22:y:2004:i:1:p:95-110
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. B.R. Chiswick & P.W. Miller, 2000. "Do Enclaves Matter in Immigrant Adjustment?," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 00-19, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    2. Gyourko, Joseph & Linneman, Peter, 1996. "Analysis of the Changing Influences on Traditional Households' Ownership Patterns," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 318-341, May.
    3. Coulson, N. Edward, 1999. "Why Are Hispanic- and Asian-American Homeownership Rates So Low?: Immigration and Other Factors," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 209-227, March.
    4. Boehm, Thomas P & Herzog, Henry W, Jr & Schlottmann, Alan M, 1991. "Intra-urban Mobility, Migration, and Tenure Choice," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(1), pages 59-68, February.
    5. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser, 1997. "Are Ghettos Good or Bad?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 827-872.
    6. Goodman, Allen C., 1990. "Demographics of individual housing demand," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 83-102, June.
    7. Painter, Gary, 2000. "Tenure Choice with Sample Selection: Differences among Alternative Samples," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 197-213, September.
    8. Lauren Krivo, 1995. "Immigrant characteristics and Hispanic-Anglo housing inequality," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 32(4), pages 599-615, November.
    9. Gary Painter, 2000. "Tenure Choice with Sample Selection: A Note on the Differences among Alternative Samples," Working Paper 8647, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    10. Kan, Kamhon, 2000. "Dynamic Modeling of Housing Tenure Choice," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 46-69, July.
    11. Bartel, Ann P, 1989. "Where Do the New U.S. Immigrants Live?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(4), pages 371-391, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Coulson, N. Edward & Dalton, Maurice, 2010. "Temporal and ethnic decompositions of homeownership rates: Synthetic cohorts across five censuses," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 155-166, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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