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Race, Immigrant Status, and Housing Tenure Choice

  • Painter, Gary
  • Gabriel, Stuart
  • Myers, Dowell

This paper applies Census microdata from 1980 and 1990 to assess the determinants of housing tenure choice among racial and ethnic groups in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Like previous research, our results indicate that endowment differences (income, education, andimmigrant status) largely explain the homeownership gap between Latinos and whites. Incontrast to previous work, we find that Asians are as likely to choose homeownership as are whites, and that status as an immigrant did not portend lower homeownership rates among Asians. However, the endowment-adjusted homeownership choice differential between whites and blacks remains sizable; further, that gap more than doubled between 1980 and 1990, to a full 11 percentage points.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 49 (2001)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 150-167

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Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:49:y:2001:i:1:p:150-167
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  1. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  2. Van de Ven, Wynand P. M. M. & Van Praag, Bernard M. S., 1981. "The demand for deductibles in private health insurance : A probit model with sample selection," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 229-252, November.
  3. Gyourko, Joseph & Linneman, Peter, 1996. "Analysis of the Changing Influences on Traditional Households' Ownership Patterns," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 318-341, May.
  4. Ihlanfeldt, Keith Ray, 1981. "An empirical investigation of alternative approaches to estimating the equilibrium demand for housing," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 97-105, January.
  5. Gabriel, Stuart A & Rosenthal, Stuart S, 1989. "Household Location and Race: Estimates of Multinomial Logit Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(2), pages 240-49, May.
  6. Boyes, William J. & Hoffman, Dennis L. & Low, Stuart A., 1989. "An econometric analysis of the bank credit scoring problem," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 3-14, January.
  7. Coulson, N. Edward, 1999. "Why Are Hispanic- and Asian-American Homeownership Rates So Low?: Immigration and Other Factors," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 209-227, March.
  8. Oaxaca, Ronald L. & Ransom, Michael R., 1994. "On discrimination and the decomposition of wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 5-21, March.
  9. Goodman, Allen C. & Kawai, Masahiro, 1982. "Permanent income, hedonic prices, and demand for housing: New evidence," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 214-237, September.
  10. Edin, P.A. & Englund, P., 1989. "Moving Cost And Housing Demand: Are Recent Movers Really In Equilibrium?," Papers 1989d, Uppsala - Working Paper Series.
  11. Boehm, Thomas P & Herzog, Henry W, Jr & Schlottmann, Alan M, 1991. "Intra-urban Mobility, Migration, and Tenure Choice," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(1), pages 59-68, February.
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