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Another Look At The Relationship Between Innovation Proxies

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  • PAUL H. JENSEN
  • ELIZABETH WEBSTER

Abstract

Shortcomings in the treatment of intangible investment in company accounts imply that there is no statistical collection for innovative activity which abides by the logic used for other economic activity data. As a consequence, analysts rely on innovation proxies derived from administrative and survey data. However, it is still unclear exactly how the different proxies are correlated, and whether the choice amongst different proxies matters. In the light of the innovation measurement, this paper takes another look at the relationship between different proxies of firm innovation. The results show that firm-level correlations between survey-based indicators and other proxies for innovation are highest for manufacturing firms and for product innovations. Copyright 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University of Adelaide and Flinders University.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul H. Jensen & Elizabeth Webster, 2009. "Another Look At The Relationship Between Innovation Proxies ," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 252-269, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecp:v:48:y:2009:i:3:p:252-269
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stefano Comino & Fabio Maria Manenti, 2015. "Intellectual Property and Innovation in Information and Communication Technology (ICT)," JRC Working Papers JRC97541, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    2. Philipp Schautschick & Christine Greenhalgh, 2016. "Empirical studies of trade marks -- The existing economic literature," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(4), pages 358-390, June.
    3. Crass, Dirk, 2014. "Which firms use trademarks - and why? Representative firm-level evidence from Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-118, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

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