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Impact of on-field football success on the off-field financial performance of AFL football clubs

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  • Matt Pinnuck
  • Brad Potter

Abstract

In this study, we examine the factors that contribute to the financial performance of clubs in the Australian Football League over the period from 1993 to 2002. Primarily, we examine the association between the on-field football success of clubs and their level of off-field financial performance. We find that match attendance is positively related to both short-term and long-term success of football clubs and also to the uncertainty as to the match outcome (i.e. the expected closeness of the match). We also find that club membership is highly persistent and is positively related to both the past football success of the club and the marketing expense incurred. Finally, we find that there is a significant association between the level of marketing revenue and the level of on-field success in the prior 2 years. Copyright (c) The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2006 AFAANZ.

Suggested Citation

  • Matt Pinnuck & Brad Potter, 2006. "Impact of on-field football success on the off-field financial performance of AFL football clubs," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 46(3), pages 499-517.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:acctfi:v:46:y:2006:i:3:p:499-517
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jeffery Borland, 2003. "Demand for Sport," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(4), pages 478-502, Winter.
    2. Dawson, Peter & Dobson, Stephen & Gerrard, Bill, 2000. "Estimating Coaching Efficiency in Professional Team Sports: Evidence from English Association Football," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 47(4), pages 399-421, September.
    3. Peel, David A & Thomas, Dennis A, 1992. "The Demand for Football: Some Evidence on Outcome Uncertainty," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 323-331.
    4. Jeff Borland & Jenny Lye, 1996. "Matching and Mobility in the Market for Australian Rules Football Coaches," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 50(1), pages 143-158, October.
    5. Jaume García & Plácido Rodríguez, 2002. "The Determinants of Football Match Attendance Revisited," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 3(1), pages 18-38, February.
    6. David Peel & Dennis Thomas, 1996. "Attendance demand: an investigation of repeat fixtures," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(6), pages 391-394.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:rqfnac:v:51:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11156-017-0673-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:gam:jgames:v:8:y:2017:i:3:p:27-:d:103200 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:spr:annopr:v:266:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10479-017-2631-z is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Antonio Samagaio & Eduardo Couto & Jorge Caiado, 2009. "Sporting, financial and stock market performance in English football: an empirical analysis of structural relationships," CEMAPRE Working Papers 0906, Centre for Applied Mathematics and Economics (CEMAPRE), School of Economics and Management (ISEG), Technical University of Lisbon.
    5. Adrian R. Bell & Chris Brooks & David Matthews & Charles Sutcliffe, 2012. "Over the moon or sick as a parrot? The effects of football results on a club's share price," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(26), pages 3435-3452, September.
    6. Chih-Hai Yang & Hsuan-Yu Lin & Chiang-Ping Chen, 2014. "Measuring the efficiency of NBA teams: additive efficiency decomposition in two-stage DEA," Annals of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 217(1), pages 565-589, June.
    7. Jakee, Keith & Kenneally, Martin & Mitchell, Hamish, 2010. "Asymmetries in scheduling slots and game-day revenues: An example from the Australian Football League," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 50-64, February.

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