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The anatomy of the global FX market through the lens of the 2013 Triennial Survey

Author

Listed:
  • Dagfinn Rime
  • Andreas Schrimpf

Abstract

Trading in the FX market reached an all-time high of $5.3 trillion per day in April 2013, a 35% increase relative to 2010. Non-dealer financial institutions, including smaller banks, institutional investors and hedge funds, have grown into the largest and most active counterparty segment. The once clear-cut divide between inter-dealer and customer trading is gone. Technological change has increased the connectivity of participants, bringing down search costs. A new form of "hot potato" trading has emerged where dealers no longer play an exclusive role.

Suggested Citation

  • Dagfinn Rime & Andreas Schrimpf, 2013. "The anatomy of the global FX market through the lens of the 2013 Triennial Survey," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:bisqtr:1312e
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Menkhoff, Lukas & Sarno, Lucio & Schmeling, Maik & Schrimpf, Andreas, 2012. "Currency momentum strategies," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(3), pages 660-684.
    2. Torsten Ehlers & Frank Packer, 2013. "FX and derivatives markets in emerging economies and the internationalisation of their currencies," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    3. Tim A. Kroencke & Felix Schindler & Andreas Schrimpf, 2014. "International Diversification Benefits with Foreign Exchange Investment Styles," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 18(5), pages 1847-1883.
    4. Michael R King & Dagfinn Rime, 2011. "The $4 trillion question: what explains FX growth since the 2007 survey?," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    5. Robert McCauley & Michela Scatigna, 2011. "Foreign exchange trading in emerging currencies: more financial, more offshore," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    6. Lyons, Richard K., 1997. "A simultaneous trade model of the foreign exchange hot potato," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-4), pages 275-298, May.
    7. Snehal Banerjee & Ilan Kremer, 2010. "Disagreement and Learning: Dynamic Patterns of Trade," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 65(4), pages 1269-1302, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:jfnres:v:39:y:2016:i:4:p:411-436 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Eichengreen, Barry & Lafarguette, Romain & Mehl, Arnaud, 2016. "Cables, Sharks and Servers: Technology and the Geography of the Foreign Exchange Market," CEPR Discussion Papers 11053, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Michael Moore & Andreas Schrimpf & Vladyslav Sushko, 2016. "Downsized FX markets: causes and implications," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    4. Havran, Dániel & Erb, Tamás, 2015. "Mit veszítünk a piaci súrlódásokkal?. A pénzügyi piacok mikrostruktúrája
      [Trading mechanisms and market frictions. Microstructure of the financial markets]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(3), pages 229-262.
    5. Morten Bech & Jhuvesh Sobrun, 2013. "FX market trends before, between and beyond Triennial Surveys," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    6. Jacob Gyntelberg & Christian Upper, 2013. "The OTC interest rate derivatives market in 2013," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    7. Emanuel Kohlscheen & Phurichai Rungcharoenkitkul, 2015. "Changing financial intermediation: implications for monetary policy transmission," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), What do new forms of finance mean for EM central banks?, volume 83, pages 65-78 Bank for International Settlements.
    8. Torsten Ehlers & Frank Packer, 2013. "FX and derivatives markets in emerging economies and the internationalisation of their currencies," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    9. Atanasov, Vladimir & Davies, Ryan J. & Merrick, John J., 2015. "Financial intermediaries in the midst of market manipulation: Did they protect the fool or help the knave?," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 210-234.
    10. Maiko Koga, 2016. "Momentum trading behavior in the FX market: Evidence from Japanese retail investors," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(1), pages 92-96.
    11. Menton, Aisling, 2014. "Irish Results of the BIS Foreign Exchange and Interest Rate Derivatives Survey 2013," Quarterly Bulletin Articles, Central Bank of Ireland, pages 72-88, April.
    12. Ben Omrane, Walid & Welch, Robert, 2016. "Tick test accuracy in foreign exchange ECN markets," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 135-152.
    13. Robert N McCauley & Chang Shu & Guonan Ma, 2014. "Non-deliverable forwards: 2013 and beyond," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    14. repec:eee:pacfin:v:48:y:2018:i:c:p:35-55 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Guonan Ma & Agustin Villar, 2014. "Internationalisation of emerging market currencies," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), The transmission of unconventional monetary policy to the emerging markets, volume 78, pages 71-86 Bank for International Settlements.
    16. Boschen, John F. & Smith, Kimberly J., 2016. "The uncovered interest rate parity anomaly and trading activity by non-dealer financial firms," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 333-342.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • C42 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Survey Methods
    • C82 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Macroeconomic Data; Data Access

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