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Is Baltic Crime Economically Rational?

Author

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  • Jorgen Lauridsen

    () (Institute of Public Health-Health Economics, University of Southern Denmark)

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether crime in the Baltic countries is governed by economic rationality. According to a simple economic model of rational behaviour, it is expected that the propensity to commit criminal activities should be negatively related to the risk of deterrence. Potential presence of higher risk profiles for certain population segments (urban groups, males, foreigners, the unemployed, and low-income earners) are controlled for. Panel data aggregated to regional levels and observed annually for the years 2000 to 2005 are applied. Controls are applied for endogeneity among criminal activity level and risk of deterrence, intra-regional correlation, inter-temporal heterogeneity and spatial spillover. The expected negative effect of risk of deterrence on criminal activity is found for all countries, whereby the hypothesised economic rationality is confirmed.

Suggested Citation

  • Jorgen Lauridsen, 2009. "Is Baltic Crime Economically Rational?," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 9(1), pages 31-38, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bic:journl:v:9:y:2009:i:1:p:31-38
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lauridsen, Jørgen T. & Zeren, Fatma & Ari, Ay?E, 2015. "Is Crime in Turkey Economically Rational?/¿Es económicamente racional el crimen en Turquía?," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 33, pages 37-52, Enero.
    2. Lauridsen, Jørgen T. & Zeren, Fatma & Ari, Ayse, 2014. "Is crime in Turkey economically rational?," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 3/2014, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Crime; panel data; illegal activities; Baltic; spatial spillover;

    JEL classification:

    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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