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Public Expenditure for Education and Economic Growth

  • Maria Neycheva

The study examines the dependence between education and economic growth. Based on the neoclassic model of growth a theoretic dependence between human capital and GDP is drawn. The effect of public expenditure for education on growth in EU countries is studied. The econometric analysis shows that higher rates of economic growth are associated with accelerated growth of state expenditure for education. For the old member-states there is also a positive dependence between research and development expenditure and the trend toward growth of the aggregate product.

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Article provided by Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute in its journal Economic Thought.

Volume (Year): (2008)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 67-81

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Handle: RePEc:bas:econth:y:2008:i:6:p:67-81
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  1. Alan B. Krueger & Mikael Lindahl, 2000. "Education for Growth: Why and For Whom?," NBER Working Papers 7591, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M & Tamura, Robert, 1990. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages S12-37, October.
  3. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Swaroop, Vinaya & Heng-fu, Zou, 1996. "The composition of public expenditure and economic growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 313-344, April.
  4. Islam, Nazrul, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-70, November.
  5. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong-Wha, 1993. "International comparisons of educational attainment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 363-394, December.
  6. Petrakis, P. E. & Stamatakis, D., 2002. "Growth and educational levels: a comparative analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 513-521, October.
  7. NONNEMAN, Walter & VANHOUDT, Patrick, 1995. "A further augmentation of the Solow model and the empirics of economic growth for OECD countries," SESO Working Papers 1995005, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics.
  8. Kyriacou, George A., 1991. "Level and Growth Effects of Human Capital: A Cross-Country Study of the Convergence Hypothesis," Working Papers 91-26, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  9. María Jesús Freire-Serén, 2001. "Human capital accumulation and economic growth," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 25(3), pages 585-602, September.
  10. Robert J. Barro, 1989. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," NBER Working Papers 3120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Vasudeva Murthy, N. R. & Chien, I. S., 1997. "The empirics of economic growth for OECD countries: Some new findings," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 425-429, September.
  12. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  13. McMahon, Walter W., 1998. "Education and Growth in East Asia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 159-172, April.
  14. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
  15. Smith, Adam, 1776. "An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number smith1776.
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