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Network Communication Model: Propensity Of Network Inter-Connectivity Based On Types Of Network Relations

Listed author(s):
  • Lokhman Hakim BIN OSMAN

    (Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia)

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    The supply chain has been described as a complex network of interrelated organizations transforming materials into finished goods and services. Supply network is complex as organizations are embedded in tiers of relationship and exchanges. Complexity resulting from the increase number of member organizations in the supply network has been known to complicate the supply network further, making the management of the supply chain a daunting task. In this study, the researcher investigated the degree of attention paid by firms in different types of network relations. Using Social Network Analysis, it was found that firms are more connected in informal network relationship that in a formal one. These findings are essential for resource management towards an effective and efficient supply chain management. Future research are discussed.

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    File URL: http://www.mnmk.ro/documents/2016_X1/Articol_2.pdf
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    Article provided by University of Craiova, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration in its journal Management and Marketing Journal.

    Volume (Year): XIII (2015)
    Issue (Month): 2 (November)
    Pages: 274-294

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    Handle: RePEc:aio:manmar:v:xiii:y:2015:i:2:p:274-294
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    1. Michael Fritsch & Martina Kauffeld-Monz, 2010. "The impact of network structure on knowledge transfer: an application of social network analysis in the context of regional innovation networks," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 44(1), pages 21-38, February.
    2. Eric Abrahamson & Lori Rosenkopf, 1997. "Social Network Effects on the Extent of Innovation Diffusion: A Computer Simulation," Organization Science, INFORMS, vol. 8(3), pages 289-309, June.
    3. Sharon Novak & Steven D. Eppinger, 2001. "Sourcing By Design: Product Complexity and the Supply Chain," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 47(1), pages 189-204, January.
    4. Ponomariov, Branco L. & Boardman, P. Craig, 2010. "Influencing scientists' collaboration and productivity patterns through new institutions: University research centers and scientific and technical human capital," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 613-624, June.
    5. Freel, Mark S., 2003. "Sectoral patterns of small firm innovation, networking and proximity," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 751-770, May.
    6. Abraham, Martin, 2009. "Why reputation is not always beneficial: Tolerance and opportunism in business networks," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 908-915, December.
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