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Supply And Demand Risks In Laboratory Forward And Spot Markets: Implications For Agriculture

Author

Listed:
  • Menkhaus, Dale J.
  • Bastian, Christopher T.
  • Phillips, Owen R.
  • O'Neill, Patrick D.

Abstract

Laboratory experimental methods are used to investigate the impacts of supply and/or demand risks on prices, quantities traded, and earnings within forward and spot market institutions. Random demand and/or supply shifts can be as much as 25 percent of the expected equilibrium outcome. Nevertheless, results suggest that the spot or forward trading institution itself has a greater influence on market outcomes than the presence of risk within the trading institutions. Sellers tend to have relatively higher earnings in a spot market than buyers, regardless of the risk. Total surplus, however, generally is greater in a forward market.

Suggested Citation

  • Menkhaus, Dale J. & Bastian, Christopher T. & Phillips, Owen R. & O'Neill, Patrick D., 2000. "Supply And Demand Risks In Laboratory Forward And Spot Markets: Implications For Agriculture," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 32(01), April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:15388
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mestelman, Stuart & Welland, Deborah & Welland, Douglas, 1987. "Advance production in posted offer markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 249-264, June.
    2. Charles N. Noussair & Charles R. Plott & Raymond G. Riezman, 2013. "An Experimental Investigation of the Patterns of International Trade," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: International Trade Agreements and Political Economy, chapter 17, pages 299-328 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    3. Boehlje, Michael, 1996. "Industrialization of Agriculture: What are the Implications?," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 11(1).
    4. Friedman,Daniel & Sunder,Shyam, 1994. "Experimental Methods," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521456821, May.
    5. Krogmeier, Joseph L. & Menkhaus, Dale J. & Phillips, Owen R. & Schmitz, John D., 1997. "An Experimental Economics Approach To Analyzing Price Discovery In Forward And Spot Markets," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(02), December.
    6. Smith, Vernon L, 1976. "Experimental Economics: Induced Value Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(2), pages 274-279, May.
    7. Krogmeier, Joseph L. & Menkhaus, Dale J. & Phillips, Owen R. & Schmitz, John D., 1997. "An Experimental Economics Approach to Analyzing Price Discovery in Forward and Spot Markets," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(02), pages 327-336, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Phillips, Owen R. & Nagler, Amy M. & Menkhaus, Dale J. & Huang, Shanshan & Bastian, Christopher T., 2014. "Trading partner choice and bargaining culture in negotiations," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 178-190.
    2. Fumasi, Roland J., 2005. "Estimating The Impacts Of Differing Price-Risk Management Strategies On The Net Income Of Salinas Valley Lettuce Producers: A Stochastic Simulation Approach," 2005 Annual Meeting, July 6-8, 2005, San Francisco, California 36310, Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Miyashita, Kazuo, 2015. "Developing an Online Market Mechanism for Trading Perishable Agricultural Commodities," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212470, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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