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Interregional Effects Of Reduced Timber Harvests: The Impact Of The Northern Spotted Owl Listing In Rural And Urban Oregon


  • Waters, Edward C.
  • Holland, David W.
  • Weber, Bruce A.


A core-periphery, multiregional, input-output model of western Oregon is used to estimate impacts of periphery timber harvest reductions resulting from listing of an endangered species. Under the most probable scenario, 31,620 total jobs would be lost in the two regions. Fourteen percent of this impact is absorbed in the core (Metro) region. Forty percent of periphery and 80% of Metro jobs lost are from service sectors, a result of important core-periphery trade in central place services. Explicit inclusion of unemployment benefits for displaced workers reduces employment loss estimates by 12% to 14%.

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  • Waters, Edward C. & Holland, David W. & Weber, Bruce A., 1994. "Interregional Effects Of Reduced Timber Harvests: The Impact Of The Northern Spotted Owl Listing In Rural And Urban Oregon," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(01), July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:31233

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. J. B. Penn & Bruce A. McCarl & Lars Brink & George D. Irwin, 1976. "Modeling and Simulation of the U.S. Economy with Alternative Energy Availabilities," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 58(4_Part_1), pages 663-671.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Yong & Weber, Bruce A., 2012. "Federal Forest Policy and Its Impact on Income and Wealth in Rural Communities," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124954, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Wagner, John E., 2000. "Regional Economic Diversity: Action, Concept, or State of Confusion," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 30(2).
    3. Elena G. Irwin & Andrew M. Isserman & Maureen Kilkenny & Mark D. Partridge, 2010. "A Century of Research on Rural Development and Regional Issues," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(2), pages 522-553.
    4. Melstrom, Richard T. & Lee, Kangil & Byl, Jacob P., 2016. "The effect of endangered species regulations on local employment: Evidence from the listing of the lesser prairie chicken," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236254, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Yong Chen & David J. Lewis & Bruce Weber, 2016. "Conservation Land Amenities And Regional Economies: A Postmatching Difference-In-Differences Analysis Of The Northwest Forest Plan," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(3), pages 373-394, June.
    6. Timothy Wojan & Anil Rupasingha, 2001. "Crisis as Opportunity: Local Context, Adaptive Agents and the Possibilities of Rural Development," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(2), pages 141-152.
    7. Steinback, Scott R., 2004. "Using Ready-Made Regional Input-Output Models to Estimate Backward-Linkage Effects of Exogenous Output Shocks," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 34(1), pages 57-71.

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    Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;


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