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Innovation and Governance in International Food Supply Chains: The Cases of Ghanaian Pineapples and South African Grapes

  • Trienekens, Jacques H.
  • Willems, Sabine
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    This paper reports an exploratory case study on innovation in, and governance of, international supply chains originating in developing countries. Two African fruit export chains are analyzed: the table grape chain from South Africa (a highly developed chain) and the pineapple chain from Ghana (a newly emerging chain). The most important market for both chains is the EU. The two cases present complementary perspectives on international supply chain development. The paper shows that Western demands in these cases lead to innovation at the producer end of the international supply chain and changes in governance structures towards chain coordination and vertical integration.

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    Article provided by International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA) in its journal International Food and Agribusiness Management Review.

    Volume (Year): 10 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:ifaamr:44900
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    1. Marcel Fafchamps, 2004. "Market Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa: Theory and Evidence," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262062364, June.
    2. Hueth, Brent & Ligon, Ethan & Wolf, Stephen & Wu, Steven, 1999. "Incentive Instruments in Agricultural Contracts: Input Control, Monitoring, Quality Measurement, and Price Risk," Staff General Research Papers 5237, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Giovannucci, Daniele & Reardon, Thomas, 2000. "Understanding Grades and Standards: and how to apply them," MPRA Paper 13549, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Thorpe, Andy & Bennett, Elizabeth, 2004. "Market-Driven International Fish Supply Chains: The Case of Nile Perch from Africa's Lake Victoria," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 7(04).
    5. Reardon, Thomas & Timmer, C. Peter, 2007. "Transformation of Markets for Agricultural Output in Developing Countries Since 1950: How Has Thinking Changed?," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, Elsevier.
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