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Cap-and-Trade: The Evolution of an Economic Idea

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  • Tietenberg, Tom

Abstract

Over the past three decades or so, emissions trading has evolved from an idea that was little more than an academic curiosity to its current role as the centerpiece of the U.S. program to control acid rain and international programs to control greenhouse gases. This essay identifies some of the key milestones of this evolution, describes how that evolution was shaped by economic analysis, elicits some of the lessons about the design and effectiveness of emissions trading that have emerged from analysis of that evolution, and points out a few of the barriers that lie in the path of achieving a truly global carbon market.

Suggested Citation

  • Tietenberg, Tom, 2010. "Cap-and-Trade: The Evolution of an Economic Idea," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 39(3), October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:95836
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/95836
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Curtis Carlson & Dallas Burtraw & Maureen Cropper & Karen L. Palmer, 2000. "Sulfur Dioxide Control by Electric Utilities: What Are the Gains from Trade?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(6), pages 1292-1326, December.
    2. Meriem Hamdi-Cherif & Céline Guivarch & Philippe Quirion, 2011. "Sectoral targets for developing countries: combining 'common but differentiated re-sponsibilities' with 'meaningful participation'," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 731-751.
    3. O'Ryan, Raul E., 1996. "Cost-Effective Policies to Improve Urban Air Quality in Santiago, Chile," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 302-313, November.
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