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Data Watch: Research Data in Health Economics

Author

Listed:
  • William N. Evans
  • Helen Levy
  • Kosali I. Simon

Abstract

In this paper, we discuss some important data sets that can be used by economists interested in conducting research in health economics. We describe six types of data sets: health components of data sets traditionally used by economists; longitudinal surveys of health and economic behavior; data on employer-provided insurance; cross-sectional surveys of households that focus on health; data on health care providers; and vital statistics. We summarize some of the leading surveys, discuss the availability of the data, identify how researchers have utilized these data and when possible, include a web address that contains more detailed information about each survey.

Suggested Citation

  • William N. Evans & Helen Levy & Kosali I. Simon, 2000. "Data Watch: Research Data in Health Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 203-216, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:14:y:2000:i:4:p:203-216
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.14.4.203
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alan C. Monheit & Jessica Primoff Vistnes, 1999. "Health Insurance Availability at the Workplace: How Important are Worker Preferences?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(4), pages 770-785.
    2. Donna B. Gilleskie, 1998. "A Dynamic Stochastic Model of Medical Care Use and Work Absence," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(1), pages 1-46, January.
    3. Chaloupka, Frank, 1991. "Rational Addictive Behavior and Cigarette Smoking," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 722-742, August.
    4. Jay Bhattacharya & Janet Currie, 2001. "Youths at Nutrition Risk: Malnourished or Misnourished?," NBER Chapters,in: Risky Behavior among Youths: An Economic Analysis, pages 483-522 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Charles Brown & Greg J. Duncan & Frank P. Stafford, 1996. "Data Watch: The Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 155-168, Spring.
    6. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2000. "Are Recessions Good for Your Health?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(2), pages 617-650.
    7. Kanika Kapur, 1998. "The impact of health on job mobility : a measure of job lock," Open Access publications 10197/297, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    8. Brigitte C. Madrian, 1994. "Employment-Based Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Is there Evidence of Job-Lock?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 27-54.
    9. Laurence C. Baker, 1994. "Does Competition from HMOs Affect Fee-For-Service Physicians?," NBER Working Papers 4920, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Ettner, Susan L., 1997. "Adverse selection and the purchase of Medigap insurance by the elderly," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 543-562, October.
    11. William N. Evans & Jeanne S. Ringel & Diana Stech, 1999. "Tobacco Taxes and Public Policy to Discourage Smoking," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 13, pages 1-56 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Kanika Kapur, 1998. "The Impact of Health on Job Mobility: A Measure of Job Lock," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 51(2), pages 282-298, January.
    13. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
    14. Willis, Robert J., 1999. "Theory confronts data: how the HRS is shaped by the economics of aging and how the economics of aging will be shaped by the HRS," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 119-145, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nasser Daneshvary & Terrence M. Clauretie, 2007. "Gender Differences In The Valuation Of Employer-Provided Health Insurance," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(4), pages 800-816, October.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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