IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/jeclit/v54y2016i4p1362-76.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Male Is a Gender, Too: A Review of Why Gender Matters in Economics by Mukesh Eswaran

Author

Listed:
  • Julie A. Nelson

Abstract

Mukesh Eswaran's Why Gender Matters in Economics presents a generally well-researched review of the literature on women and economics, and admirably attempts take a global perspective. Eswaran's analysis is compromised, however, by an unreflective use of perspectives and methods that themselves, when seen in a broader perspective, reflect gendered biases. With particular reference to Eswaran's discussions of gender differences in preferences, the preferential treatment of groups, and work/family issues, this essay outlines how these biases arise, and how economic analysis must change if it is to become more rigorous.

Suggested Citation

  • Julie A. Nelson, 2016. "Male Is a Gender, Too: A Review of Why Gender Matters in Economics by Mukesh Eswaran," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(4), pages 1362-1376, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jeclit:v:54:y:2016:i:4:p:1362-76
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jel.20151398
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jel.20151398
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.aeaweb.org/articles/attachments?retrieve=CxuluUXYI9ayPs9A_aL5UEWSPvQ_KV48
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to AEA members and institutional subscribers.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Elissa Braunstein & Nancy Folbre, 2001. "To Honor and Obey: Efficiency, Inequality, and Patriarchal Property Rights," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 25-44.
    2. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz & Ilyana Kuziemko, 2006. "The Homecoming of American College Women: The Reversal of the College Gender Gap," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(4), pages 133-156, Fall.
    3. Folbre, Nancy, 1982. "Exploitation Comes Home: A Critique of the Marxian Theory of Family Labour," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(4), pages 317-329, December.
    4. Stern, Nicholas, 2014. "Ethics, Equity And The Economics Of Climate Change Paper 2: Economics And Politics," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(03), pages 445-501, November.
    5. Julie A. Nelson, 2014. "The power of stereotyping and confirmation bias to overwhelm accurate assessment: the case of economics, gender, and risk aversion," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(3), pages 211-231, September.
    6. Susan Himmelweit, 2007. "The prospects for caring: economic theory and policy analysis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(4), pages 581-599, July.
    7. Julie A. Nelson, 2015. "Are Women Really More Risk-Averse Than Men? A Re-Analysis Of The Literature Using Expanded Methods," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 566-585, July.
    8. Stern, Nicholas, 2014. "Ethics, Equity And The Economics Of Climate Change Paper 1: Science And Philosophy," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(03), pages 397-444, November.
    9. Ferber, Marianne A & Birnbaum, Bonnie G, 1977. " The "New Home Economics:" Retrospects and Prospects," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(1), pages 19-28, June.
    10. Martha J. Bailey, 2006. "More Power to the Pill: The Impact of Contraceptive Freedom on Women's Life Cycle Labor Supply," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(1), pages 289-320.
    11. Stern, Nicholas, 2014. "Ethics, equity and the economics of climate change paper 2: economics and politics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 62704, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Rachel Croson & Uri Gneezy, 2009. "Gender Differences in Preferences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 448-474, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • B54 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Feminist Economics
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:jeclit:v:54:y:2016:i:4:p:1362-76. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael P. Albert). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aeaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.