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Moral Hazard and Claims Deterrence in Private Disability Insurance

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  • David Autor
  • Mark Duggan
  • Jonathan Gruber

Abstract

Exploiting within-firm, over-time variation in plan parameters for nearly 10,000 Long Term Disability (LTD) policies held by US employers, we present the first empirical analysis of the determinants of private LTD spells. We find that a shorter waiting period and a higher replacement rate increase the incidence of LTD spells. Sixty percent of the latter effect is due to the mechanical censoring of shorter spells, with the remainder due to the deterrence of spells that would have continued beyond the waiting period. Deterrence is driven primarily by a reduction in the incidence of shorter duration spells and less severe disabilities.

Suggested Citation

  • David Autor & Mark Duggan & Jonathan Gruber, 2014. "Moral Hazard and Claims Deterrence in Private Disability Insurance," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 110-141, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aejapp:v:6:y:2014:i:4:p:110-41
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/app.6.4.110
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Johannes S. Kunz & Kevin E. Staub & Rainer Winkelmann, 2021. "Predicting individual effects in fixed effects panel probit models," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 184(3), pages 1109-1145, July.
    2. David Autor & Andreas Kostøl & Magne Mogstad & Bradley Setzler, 2019. "Disability Benefits, Consumption Insurance, and Household Labor Supply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 109(7), pages 2613-2654, July.
    3. Hamish Low & Luigi Pistaferri, 2020. "Disability Insurance: Theoretical Trade‐Offs and Empirical Evidence," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(1), pages 129-164, March.
    4. Biener, Christian & Eling, Martin & Landmann, Andreas & Pradhan, Shailee, 2018. "Can group incentives alleviate moral hazard? The role of pro-social preferences," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 230-249.
    5. Kunz, J.S.; & Staub, K.E.; & Winkelmann, R.;, 2018. "Predicting fixed effects in panel probit models," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 18/23, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Fevang, Elisabeth & Hardoy, Inés & Røed, Knut, 2013. "Getting Disabled Workers Back to Work: How Important Are Economic Incentives?," IZA Discussion Papers 7137, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Eliason, Marcus & Johansson, Per & Nilsson, Martin, 2019. "Forward-looking moral hazard in social insurance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 84-98.
    8. Sebastian Soika, 2018. "Moral Hazard and Advantageous Selection in Private Disability Insurance," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 43(1), pages 97-125, January.
    9. Matthew J. Hill & Jose I. Silva & Judit Vall Castello, 2019. "Act now: The effects of the 2008 Spanish disability reform," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(7), pages 906-920, July.
    10. Ho Christine, 2019. "Optimal Disability Insurance with Informal Child Care," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 19(2), pages 1-42, April.
    11. Hassink, Wolter & Koning, Pierre & Zwinkels, Wim, 2015. "Employers Opting Out of Public Disability Insurance: Selection or Incentive Effects?," IZA Discussion Papers 9181, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Richard V. Burkhauser & Mary C. Daly & Nicolas R. Ziebarth, 2016. "Protecting working-age people with disabilities: experiences of four industrialized nations [Absicherung von Personen mit Erwerbsminderung: Erfahrungen aus vier Industrieländern]," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 49(4), pages 367-386, December.
    13. David Stapleton & Robert Burns & Benjamin Doornink & Mary Harris & Robert Anfield & Winthrop Cashdollar & Brian Gifford & Kevin Ufier, 2015. "Targeting Early Intervention to Workers Who Need Help to Stay in the Labor Force," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 496474bae5054b11bfe429d48, Mathematica Policy Research.
    14. Eliason, Marcus & Johansson, Per & Nilsson, Martin, 2018. "Forward-looking moral hazard in social insurance: evidence from a natural experiment," Working Paper Series 2018:11, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    15. Pian Shu, 2013. "Asset Accumulation and Labor Force Participation of Disability Insurance Applicants," Harvard Business School Working Papers 14-008, Harvard Business School.
    16. Bíró, Anikó & Elek, Péter, 2020. "Job loss, disability insurance and health expenditure," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    17. David C. Stapleton & Yonatan Ben-Shalom & David R. Mann, "undated". "The Employment/Eligibility Service System: A New Gateway for Employment Supports and Social Security Disability Benefits," Mathematica Policy Research Reports d8835946ad2743028b4b7acfc, Mathematica Policy Research.
    18. Tenenbaum, Victoria & Sánchez, Guillermo, 2020. "La jubilación por incapacidad en el Uruguay," Estudios y Perspectivas – Oficina de la CEPAL en Montevideo 46, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions

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